Is measurable physics based on three things?

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Is measurable physics based on three things? Mass, the frequency of that mass, and the linear velocity that we consider measurable creation?

Linear velocity is defined as something that is moving between some version of zero velocity (a hard black hole, Stephen Hawking's math) and light speed.
 

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Andy Resnick
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What is 'measurable' physics, and does that mean there is also 'nonmeasurable' physics?
 
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cjl
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Well, I haven't the faintest clue what you're trying to get at with your second statement (black holes have zero velocity?), but you're completely missing E&M, among other things.
 
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Mass, acceleration, distance, and time: is all a big part of classical physics and measurement.
 
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ZapperZ
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We will wait for the OP to come back and post further clarification/explanation, or else this thread is nothing but noise.

Zz.
 
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K^2
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From perspective of Quantum Mechanics, any Hermitian operator you can apply to a state corresponds to a measurable quantity. So there are infinitely many measurable quantities you may wish to consider. However, you can only have a limited number of independent measurable quantities, as you can only have a limited number of independent Hermitian matrices. Unfortunately, that still doesn't completely answer the question, because this number depends on dimensionality of the state vector, and you basically end up saying that you can have as many measurable quantities as you provide for in your model. Whether or not all of these make sense with classical notions of measurable quantities again depends on the model.

In Classical Mechanics, a state of a point mass can be described by its position and momentum. So a mechanical system can be entirely described by a density distribution in 6-dimensional space called Phase Space. Hope that helps.
 
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What is 'measurable' physics, and does that mean there is also 'nonmeasurable' physics?
Everything that goes through a "black hole" Andy, ceases to be measurable physics.
 
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Well, I haven't the faintest clue what you're trying to get at with your second statement (black holes have zero velocity?), but you're completely missing E&M, among other things.
Everything that goes through a "black hole" has no memory, which is impossible.
 
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From perspective of Quantum Mechanics, any Hermitian operator you can apply to a state corresponds to a measurable quantity. So there are infinitely many measurable quantities you may wish to consider. However, you can only have a limited number of independent measurable quantities, as you can only have a limited number of independent Hermitian matrices. Unfortunately, that still doesn't completely answer the question, because this number depends on dimensionality of the state vector, and you basically end up saying that you can have as many measurable quantities as you provide for in your model. Whether or not all of these make sense with classical notions of measurable quantities again depends on the model.

In Classical Mechanics, a state of a point mass can be described by its position and momentum. So a mechanical system can be entirely described by a density distribution in 6-dimensional space called Phase Space. Hope that helps.
It does help. Stephen Hawking's "black hole" math creates the possibility that measurable physics lies between two other "linear velocity ranges". Which is actually sort of impossible according to today's physics. And that we can only measure what is within our "linear velocity range". There are two parts to physics, one is defining the environment and the other is studying the results of that environment. Modern physics is studying the results of that environment which seems to include at least two linear velocity ranges and maybe a third, all interacting to create a measurable reality (measurable environment). You go through a "black hole" you are not going to come out in our measurable velocity range. Stephen Hawking's black hole math supports that, which is why he got into trouble with the physics community or at least a vocal part of it. Stephen Hawking's defined the result of tunneling out of our measurable velocity range into a slower velocity range. And it could be said that the "big bang" is evidence that something was accelerated from a lower velocity rang into our velocity range and that that event resulted in what we consider a measurable reality.

So far everything seems to boil do to vibrational frequency, particle mass (and its spin), and linear velocity range.
 

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