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Is the process of fusion really enough to keep stars from imploding?

  1. May 19, 2012 #1
    Hi,

    has it really been proven that the process of fusion is REALLY enough to keep stars from imploding under their own gravitational force???

    I suspect that there might possibly be another factor involved, in keeping the stars inflated until they start to cool and hit that point of critical-mass--
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 19, 2012 #2

    russ_watters

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    Define "proven"? The observations match our mathematical models pretty well. So that's about all we can do.
     
  4. May 19, 2012 #3
    well, I would like to see a paper, or something, anything, that really proves (mathematically is fine,) that the process of fusion is really enough to keep the star from imploding.
    ...The explosive force of fusion must also be documented in its strength independent of the example of the star, as well... so the force of the process is verified as the same in both instances.

    (I am wary of something like: the star requires X amount of explosive power to stay inflated , and so fusion must provide X amount of explosive force. )


    I mean if that is not too much to ask...
     
  5. May 20, 2012 #4

    russ_watters

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    I'm not sure what you would like to see exactly since all of the math happens inside a computer, but here is a description of how it works: http://homepages.wmich.edu/~korista/starmodls.html

    Also, I think you probably have the chicken and egg backwards: scientists know about fusion based on "doing" fusion on earth. Then they apply that to stars. It isn't a guessing game or circular logic.
     
  6. May 20, 2012 #5
    thank you so much for directing me to that..
    to avoid beting around the bush, I have this idea that a certain something in stars (nto telling you what muwahahah [...]) might exhibit anti-gravity properties, that would be conducive to a stars' inflation, until it begins to cool down and hit its critical-mass (if it is to become a black-hole.)

    This anti-gravity effect would be small, but still yet measurable. If the fusion alone has not been proven to be fully sufficient to keep the star inflated, then perhaps that would be indicative of a second factor, which involved my theory of this particular substance having anti-gravity properties.

    but... if the force of fusion has been calculated (I suppose it is done at the big x-ray machine in new mexico,) and all the numbers are accounted for..

    then there is not much room left for my theory..

    thank you again, 'russ watters'
     
  7. May 20, 2012 #6

    russ_watters

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    You're putting the cart before the horse there -- before even understanding what the existing theories say and how they work, you have a vague idea that they might be wrong. That is an extremely anti-science stance that we do not support here.
     
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