Limiting Reagent Qs: NaOH & H2SO4 | C6H6 & Br2

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In summary, the conversation discusses two questions related to chemical reactions. The first question asks for the number of grams of water produced when 14.56 g of NaOH reacts with 13.49 g of H2SO4. The second question asks for the amount of non-limiting reactant remaining after 8.02 g of benzene reacts with 14.93 g of bromine. Both questions involve finding the limiting reagent and using the given ratios to solve for the desired quantity.
  • #1
hockeyfghts5
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Homework Statement


Question 1
How would your solve this? I balanced it now i am stuck. Same with the second problem.
2 NaOH + H2SO4 = Na2SO4 + 2 H2O

If 14.56 g of NaOH was reacted with 13.49 g of H2SO4, how many grams of water would be produced. (Hint What is the limiting reagent?)

Question 2

C6H6 + Br2 = C6H5Br + HBr

Benzene and bromine react to form bromobenzene, as represented by the equation below. If 8.02 g of benzene were reacted with 14.93 g of bromine, how many grams of the non-limiting reagent is unreacted

Homework Equations


The Attempt at a Solution

 
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  • #2
You correctly balanced the reaction for reactants and products. The reaction uses 2 moles of NaOH for 1 mole of H2SO4. Decide how this ratio compares to the ratio of your given grams of each which are used in the example.
 
  • #3
do i take the ratio of of each of the given grams?
 
  • #4
Think in terms of moles, not masses.
 
  • #5
I believe that what Borek is saying is that the number/coefficient infront of each compound in your balanced equation is to indicate the ratio of moles/particles of each compound. After understanding this, you can try to find the number of moles of NaOH using its mass as given in your question and use the ratio to find the number of moles of H2SO4. Then you can find the number of moles of H2SO4 with its mass as stated in the question and compare the amounts. This should help with finding the limiting reactant.
 

Related to Limiting Reagent Qs: NaOH & H2SO4 | C6H6 & Br2

1. What is a limiting reagent?

A limiting reagent is the reactant in a chemical reaction that is completely used up first, thereby limiting the amount of product that can be formed.

2. How do I determine the limiting reagent in a chemical reaction?

To determine the limiting reagent, you must first write a balanced chemical equation for the reaction. Then, calculate the moles of each reactant present in the reaction. The reactant with the lowest number of moles is the limiting reagent.

3. Can a limiting reagent be different in different scenarios?

Yes, the limiting reagent can vary depending on the reaction conditions. For example, if the amounts of reactants are changed, the limiting reagent may also change.

4. Why is it important to identify the limiting reagent in a reaction?

Identifying the limiting reagent is important because it determines the maximum amount of product that can be formed in a reaction. It also allows for the calculation of the theoretical yield, which is the expected amount of product based on the limiting reagent.

5. Can more than one reagent be limiting in a reaction?

No, only one reagent can be the limiting reagent in a reaction. However, there may be more than one excess reagent, which is a reactant that remains after the limiting reagent is completely consumed.

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