Searching for the Ninth Planet: Solar System Migration

In summary, there is still a discrepancy in the orbit of Neptune that the discovery of Pluto was supposed to solve yet didn't.
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wolram
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Does our solar system host a Ninth planet, If so has our solar system under gone planetary migration?
 
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Examination of the orbital characteristics of Trans-Neptunian bodies suggested to Trujillo & Shepherd (2014) that these characteristics were the likely consequence of a massive body of super-Earth dimensions. Its existence has not been confirmed by direct observation and not all researchers agree with the interpretation of the data. Such a body would certainly meet the first two definitions of a planet as noted by Drakkith, but it would be difficult to determine whether or not it met the third. (The third requirement was always, in my view, a poor constraint, constructed to eliminate Pluto, Sedna and the like, but not well conceived to deal with novel discoveries.)

A more recent discussion of the concept can be found in this paper by Khain et al (2018).

In regard to migration practically all hypotheses for solar system formation include migration, but the details (timing and bodies involved) differ from explanation to explanation.
 
  • #4
There's still a discrepancy in the orbit of Neptune that the discovery of Pluto was supposed to solve yet didn't...so there's still that unanswered question!
 
  • #5
alantheastronomer said:
There's still a discrepancy in the orbit of Neptune that the discovery of Pluto was supposed to solve yet didn'

Astronomy magazine disagrees with you: http://www.astronomy.com/magazine/ask-astro/2017/01/planet-nine-effect

I have to ask - are you actually an astronomer? That is, someone paid to do astronomy? Your message seems to be authoratitative, but often contradict what I know about astronomy (and I have only a MS in that field, and even that is in "physics and astronomy". My PhD is in physics only)
 
  • #6
Actually, I'm an astrophysicist, but that was too many characters for physics forums to accept as my name, so I shortened it. I'm currently not employed nor affiliated with any institution. I went to grad school in the early eighties before Voyager II reached Neptune, so I was unaware that the discrepancy had been resolved - thanks for alerting me to this development!
 
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Related to Searching for the Ninth Planet: Solar System Migration

1. What is the ninth planet and why is it important to search for it?

The ninth planet, also known as Planet X, is a hypothesized planet in our solar system that is believed to be located beyond Neptune. Its existence was proposed to explain the unusual orbits of some objects in the Kuiper Belt. It is important to search for this planet because its discovery could help us understand the evolution and formation of our solar system.

2. How did the idea of the ninth planet come about?

The idea of the ninth planet came about when astronomers noticed that some objects in the Kuiper Belt, a region beyond Neptune, had unusual orbits that could not be explained by the known planets in our solar system. This led to the hypothesis that there must be another large planet beyond Neptune that was influencing the orbits of these objects.

3. What evidence supports the existence of the ninth planet?

There are several lines of evidence that support the existence of the ninth planet. These include the unusual orbits of objects in the Kuiper Belt, the clustering of orbits of these objects in a specific direction, and computer simulations that suggest the presence of a large, distant planet in our solar system. Additionally, recent studies have found evidence of a large planet in the outer solar system based on the gravitational influence it has on other objects.

4. How is the ninth planet different from the other planets in our solar system?

The ninth planet is believed to be a giant planet, similar in size to Neptune or Uranus. However, it is much more distant from the sun and has a highly elliptical orbit, taking thousands of years to complete one orbit. Additionally, the ninth planet is thought to be a part of a group of objects called "detached objects" that have orbits that are not influenced by the gas giants in our solar system.

5. How are scientists searching for the ninth planet?

Scientists are using a variety of methods to search for the ninth planet. These include using large telescopes to scan the sky for any signs of a distant object, analyzing data from past surveys of the outer solar system, and conducting computer simulations to predict the possible location of the planet. Some scientists are also looking for the ninth planet by studying the orbits of objects in the Kuiper Belt and analyzing their gravitational interactions with other objects in our solar system.

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