Star is expected to be torn apart in the center of our Galaxy

So "mid to late 2013" - almost the time, are there any new observations yet?This seems to be the website that might announce something http://www.swift-sgra.com/Based on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sagittarius_A*In summary, predictions suggest that the gas cloud G2 will have its closest approach to the black hole in mid to late 2013 at a distance of 3000 times the radius of the event horizon. Opinions differ on the potential effect this may have on both G2 and the black hole. There are hopes for new observations to be announced on the website http://www.swift-sgra.com/ as the event approaches.
  • #1
Dmitry67
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1
Based on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sagittarius_A*

Predictions of its orbit suggest it will have a closest approach to the black hole (a perinigricon) in mid to late 2013. At this time the gas cloud will be at a distance of just over 3000 times the radius of the event horizon (or ~260 AU, 36 light hours) from the black hole. Opinions differ as to the effect this might have on both G2 and the black hole.

So "mid to late 2013" - almost the time, are there any new observations yet?
 
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  • #3
Dmitry67 said:
Based on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sagittarius_A*



So "mid to late 2013" - almost the time, are there any new observations yet?

That is just referring to the gas cloud G2 isn't it? From what that page suggest, the observations of that gas cloud and how it reacts to the SMBH will indicate whether there is a 'body' keeping G2 intact. Either way, its going to be fantastic.


Damo
 

What is the significance of a star being torn apart in the center of our Galaxy?

A star being torn apart in the center of our Galaxy is significant because it provides valuable insights into the dynamics and structure of our Galaxy. This event, known as a tidal disruption event, can help us better understand the supermassive black hole at the center of our Galaxy and the surrounding environment.

How does a star get torn apart in the center of our Galaxy?

A star can get torn apart in the center of our Galaxy due to the strong gravitational forces of the supermassive black hole. As the star gets closer to the black hole, it experiences extreme tidal forces that stretch and tear it apart. This process is known as spaghettification.

What happens to the material of the star after it is torn apart?

The material of the star is heated and accelerated by the intense gravitational forces as it falls towards the black hole. This results in a bright flare of radiation that can be observed by telescopes. The material then forms a disk around the black hole, known as an accretion disk.

Is it common for stars to be torn apart in the center of our Galaxy?

Tidal disruption events, where a star is torn apart by a black hole, are rare events in our Galaxy. It is estimated that only one star is disrupted by the supermassive black hole at the center of our Galaxy every 10,000 years.

What can we learn from studying stars that are torn apart in the center of our Galaxy?

Studying stars that are torn apart in the center of our Galaxy can provide valuable information about the properties of the supermassive black hole, such as its mass and spin. It can also help us understand the physics of extreme gravitational forces and the formation of accretion disks. Additionally, these events can serve as a powerful tool for studying distant galaxies and their central black holes.

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