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The Birth of (somewhat) Sophisticated Comedy

  1. Nov 25, 2008 #1

    baywax

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    Looks like the Greeks had one up on Monty Python.

    This may be offensive to some people since the Greeks used a slave instead of a parrot in their comedy sketches.

    http://ca.news.yahoo.com/s/reuters/081114/odds/odd_us_comedy

    If anyone has any really old comedy links or texts... like ancient Egyptian/Sumerian/Indian etc.. Humour... please post it here!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 25, 2008 #2

    mgb_phys

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    How many Hittites does it take to change a lamp wick?
     
  4. Nov 25, 2008 #3

    baywax

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    In the dark?

    OK, my guess,

    47. 1 king to preside, 9 states-people to form a quorum and decide to send 30 warriors to attack the village with all the lamp wicks, 7 village folks to dip the wicks in oil and light them.

    and a partridge in a... ok, not many trees around there.
     
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2008
  5. Nov 26, 2008 #4

    baywax

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    I don't quite get what's funny here...
    I guess its a kind of funny Ancient Egyptian irony or justice.
     
  6. Nov 27, 2008 #5

    baywax

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    I've managed to dig a little deeper into history back to the age of Aristophanes, 456 B.C to 380 B.C.



    This is from a play by Aristophanes known as " the comedy monolog of a man" and could well be describing the financial turmoils of todays banking magnates.

    Both quotes from:

    http://www.theatrehistory.com/ancient/aristophanes001.html
     
  7. Nov 27, 2008 #6

    mgb_phys

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    Comedy didn't mean funny - it used to mean fantastic/imaginary.
    Thats why Shakespeare's comedies aren''t funny.
     
  8. Nov 27, 2008 #7

    baywax

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    Ah ha!

    Well, my Oxford says this about comedy:

     
  9. Nov 27, 2008 #8

    mgb_phys

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    Perhaps the composers of the OED think Shakespeare's comedies are funny - nobody who has had to watch them does.
     
  10. Nov 27, 2008 #9

    baywax

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    From A Comedy Of Errors
    by Bill Shakespeare

    http://www.shakespeare-online.com/quotes/comedyquotes.html


    :rofl:

    I see what you mean!
     
  11. Nov 28, 2008 #10
    I found Aristophanes' Lysistrata pretty funny when I read it a few years back.
     
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