What are the connections between mathematics and physical sciences?

  • Thread starter sacrovalle
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In summary, mathematics and physical sciences are tightly intertwined and have a strong connection. Mathematics provides the necessary tools and language to describe and analyze physical phenomena, making it an essential part of the scientific process. It helps in formulating theories, creating models, and solving equations to understand the underlying principles of the physical world. On the other hand, physical sciences provide real-world applications for mathematical concepts, validating and refining theories through experiments and observations. This symbiotic relationship between mathematics and physical sciences has led to groundbreaking discoveries and advancements in our understanding of the universe.
  • #1
sacrovalle
How did you find PF?
I was looking for recommendations on a calculus-based physics book, and soon I started to read several very interesting threads.
Hello everyone, name's Sacrovalle, I'm a university freshman from northern Mexico, currently looking towards aerospace engineering and studying physics in-depth in my free time. I speak Spanish, English, French and I'm currently learning German.

Although I've had experience with science olympics (I'm currently a trainer at my state), these first months have been quite the surprise: I took Calculus in high school and have made proofs through the Math Olympiad, especially in geometry, but here I've discovered I lack a proper, rigorous understanding of it. The curriculum at my school includes Physics till second semester, so I've taken Tippens to remember some concepts and problems. This first semester I've devoted to seeing opportunities, attending conferences and getting to know the teachers and their areas of research, so I have already some general idea on what to pursue during the career (at least at undergraduate level). In Physics, I'm interested in astro, biomedical and geo.

I try to have an updated and well-rounded knowledge, so I enjoy learning about linguistics, archaeology and world history as well. I like literature too, among my favorite books are Cien Años de Soledad (A Hundred Years of Solitude) by García Márquez, the Lord of the Rings and Asimov's Foundation. In the arts department I'm definitely lacking , but I do enjoy and try to write once in a while and draw something here and there. I like to cook and bake, and in music I'm inclined to New Age and classic Rock.

If you actually read this, thanks!
 
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  • #2
My impression based on your post #1 discussion is, you are primarily interested in physical sciences. Following your undergraduate program, whichever you choose, and your current way of actively exploring the physical science field, will keep your educational progress well lined and yourself aware.

The connection between Mathematics and all physical sciences is very strong. One would imagine that you will have "Calculus-based" Physics courses to prepare you in the university for the rest of the undergraduate Physics and other physical science courses. Algebra, Calculus, Physics, Trigonometry are not divorced from each other.
 

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