What happened to the mysterious piano in Biscayne Bay?

  • Thread starter jtbell
  • Start date
In summary, "Da da da dum (glub glub)" is an onomatopoeic phrase that imitates the sound of a marching band accompanied by a fish swimming in water. It is often used in comedic or playful contexts, and can be spelled with or without "glub glub" to emphasize the underwater aspect. While it has no specific origin or meaning, it is commonly used in comedic skits and children's songs. It can also be used in a scientific context to represent sounds or actions. Though there is limited research on this specific phrase, studies have shown that the use of onomatopoeia can enhance communication and cognition.
  • #1

jtbell

Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Homework Helper
15,899
5,491
Da da da dum... (glub glub)

Before this piano gets hauled away, someone should find REO Speedwagon and get them to use it in a video of their "You Can Tune a Piano but You Can't Tune a Fish."

Teen explains origins of mystery piano [in Biscayne Bay]
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2


I don't believe the kid. I still think it was Kiri's Piano.
 

1. What is "Da da da dum (glub glub)"?

"Da da da dum (glub glub)" is an onomatopoeic phrase that imitates the sound of a marching band accompanied by a fish swimming in water. It is often used in comedic or playful contexts.

2. Why is it sometimes spelled "Da da da dum" and other times "Da da da dum (glub glub)"?

The addition of "glub glub" to the phrase is meant to emphasize the underwater aspect of the sound. It is not always necessary to include "glub glub" in the spelling, but it can be used for added effect.

3. Is there a specific origin or meaning behind this phrase?

The phrase "Da da da dum (glub glub)" has no specific origin or meaning, and is simply used as a humorous or playful sound effect. It is often associated with comedic skits or children's songs.

4. Can it be used in a scientific context?

While "Da da da dum (glub glub)" may not have a specific scientific meaning, it can still be used in a scientific context to represent certain sounds or actions. For example, it could be used to imitate the sound of a fish swimming in a lab experiment or the sound of a marching band at a science conference.

5. Is there any research or studies on the use of this phrase?

There is limited research on the use of "Da da da dum (glub glub)" specifically, but there is plenty of research on the use of onomatopoeia in language and its effects on communication and cognition. Overall, the use of onomatopoeic phrases like this one can add humor and creativity to language use.

Back
Top