What is the sense of Ehrenfest time?

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In summary, the conversation discusses the use of the term "chaos" in classical quantum physics textbooks and its current usage in self-published and original research. The participants are interested in the opinions of specialists and are looking for "main stream" references to review. One reference mentioned is a book on synergetics, which may require further scrutiny.
  • #1
mclaudt
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Does that term have the real conventional meaning?

I'm only beginning to learn chaos theory, and I would like to avoid some questionable ideas. It seems that classical quantum physics textbooks do not use this therm. As far as I understand, it is used now in some self-published/original researches. I may be wrong.

What do specialists think about it? Thanks a lot.
 
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Also interested. Do you have any "main stream" references I could review?
 
  • #3
edgepflow said:
Also interested. Do you have any "main stream" references I could review?
I saw this term here http://www.iqc.ca/publications/tutorials/chaos.pdf

It cites some arXiv thesis, and also this Springer's book http://books.google.com/books?id=Orv0BXoorFEC&q=ehrenfest#v=snippet&q=ehrenfest&f=false http://rghost.net/12934951 Book has Synergetics label, so it is quite hard to take it without a due care.
 
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Related to What is the sense of Ehrenfest time?

1. What is the Ehrenfest time?

The Ehrenfest time is a concept in physics named after Paul Ehrenfest. It is a measure of the time it takes for a quantum mechanical state to become classical, or for a classical state to become quantum mechanical. It is defined as the time it takes for an initially localized wave function to spread to a characteristic size of the system.

2. How is the Ehrenfest time calculated?

The Ehrenfest time can be calculated by dividing the square of the characteristic length scale of the system by the diffusion coefficient. The characteristic length scale can be determined by considering the average distance that a particle travels in a given time, while the diffusion coefficient can be calculated from the system's Hamiltonian.

3. What is the significance of the Ehrenfest time?

The Ehrenfest time is significant because it represents the time at which a quantum system transitions into a classical system. This transition is important in understanding the behavior of physical systems, as classical mechanics and quantum mechanics have different predictions for the behavior of particles.

4. How does the Ehrenfest time relate to the uncertainty principle?

The Ehrenfest time and the uncertainty principle are related in that they both involve the concept of spreading. The Ehrenfest time represents the time it takes for a wave function to spread, while the uncertainty principle states that the position and momentum of a particle cannot be simultaneously known with absolute certainty due to the inherent spreading of the wave function.

5. Can the Ehrenfest time be observed in real-world experiments?

Yes, the Ehrenfest time can be observed in experiments involving quantum systems. For example, the spreading of wave functions can be observed in experiments involving single-particle interference, where the characteristic spreading time can be measured. Additionally, the Ehrenfest time has been observed in experiments involving Bose-Einstein condensates and quantum dots.

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