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What would it take for this to lift a man?

  1. Jun 22, 2015 #1
    What would it take for this to lift a man?


    Hi, as an inventor i am interested to know what it would take to make one of these ideas lift someone into the air? Lets imagine that it is made of graphene covered carbonado mesh frame, such that it is very light. As for power, lets use a rotory engine e.g. As from the Mazda rx7 ~ because they are small and light + very powerful. Except it will be made from carbonado sphere’s surrounding the piston chamber, which would be as if dropped down into the spheres like a cup.

    The entire weight would be majoritively that of fuel, a driver/rider, then the lightwieght vehicle.


    Is this plausible?


    Dragonfly simulation; BionicOpter of Festo at the ACHEMA Press Preview Achema_2015

    http://www.festo.com/net/nl-be_be/SupportPortal/Details/373260/PressArticle.aspx


    Bird simulation;

    SmartBird – Bird flight deciphered


    http://www.festo.com/cms/en_corp/11369.htm


    _
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 22, 2015 #2

    russ_watters

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Without any details of the inventions it is impossible for us to have any idea how to power them.
     
    Last edited: Jun 22, 2015
  4. Jun 24, 2015 #3
    What i am actually looking for in terms of my invention is;


    what would it take in terms of speed and lift, to lift a man in terms of wing aerofoil shape alone. I.e. Without thrust momentum. So like how helicopters have blades which are wings but the wings are twisted which gives it thrust momentum.


    More specifically i am looking at a mass of small wings.


    I think my query could be answered by asking; how many flies would it take to lift a man?


    I read somewhere that the flapping of the wings in bird-flight, does nothing, except move the wings back to a position they can push through the air on the next stroke. Thus i am assuming we can remove the up/down motion.
     
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