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Why can we see Venus?

  1. Apr 3, 2012 #1
    I was looking at the sky last night, and I saw Venus to the west, really high in the sky. It was brighter than any star that night. Why am I able to see it? It seems like, since we are on the side of the earth facing opposite the sun at night, I should be able to only see the planets that are further away from the sun than the earth. Can someone explain why I'm thinking about this the wrong way? Thanks. (I live in Michigan by the way, in case that information is needed)
     
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  3. Apr 3, 2012 #2

    Borek

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  4. Apr 3, 2012 #3

    Drakkith

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    Find a ball and mark a spot on it. Then hold it up to a light. The dot represents your position on the Earth. Rotate the ball around until the spot just crosses the line between light and dark. As you will see the side of the ball the spot is on is not facing away from the light, it is facing perpindicular to it. This is why we can see inner planets when they are on the right places in their orbits relative to us and the Sun.
     
  5. Apr 3, 2012 #4
    If you're exactly at the opposite side of the earth as the sun, (at midnight, near the equator) it will indeed be inpossible to see anything that is closer to the sun than the earth.
    If the sun is only 10 degrees below the horizon, you will be able to see objects at an angle of 10 degrees or more away from the sun.
     
  6. Apr 3, 2012 #5

    turbo

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    Outer planets can be apparently 100% illuminated from reflected sunlight. Inner planets that undergo phases and varying separations from the Sun are a different matter.
     
  7. Apr 4, 2012 #6

    mfb

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    Objects not to scale, red=light, the black line is how you can see the venus.

    attachment.php?attachmentid=45878&d=1333546088.jpg
     

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  8. Apr 6, 2012 #7
    Depends on where Venus is in relation to the sun and to earth.
     
  9. Apr 10, 2012 #8

    Redbelly98

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    We can also see a crescent moon, even though it is closer to the sun than we are during crescent phases.
     
  10. Apr 10, 2012 #9
    Can someone explain why venus has phases, but no other planets do? Every planet is orbiting the sun, shouldn't every planet have a phase relative to earth? Mercury, mars etc..
     
  11. Apr 10, 2012 #10

    DaveC426913

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    Mercury has phases too. Mercury and Venus share a common trait having to do with their location relative to Earth.

    All other planets (Mars Jupiter, Saturn, Neptune, Uranus) share a common trait having to do with their location relative to Earth.

    Can you think what these traits are? (Mercury/Venus) versus (Mars/Jupiter/Saturn/Neptune/Uranus)?
     
  12. Apr 10, 2012 #11
    Well Mars should also have a phases. Just longer more played out phases. Just because Mars is farther out than Earth, doesn't mean it cant have a phase.
     
  13. Apr 10, 2012 #12

    cepheid

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    Actually yeah it kind of does mean that Mars can't have a phase other than full or just slightly less than full. I'd encourage you to try and draw it out.
     
  14. Apr 10, 2012 #13

    cepheid

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    Also, the farther out the planet, the closer it is to just always being at full phase. If you think about it, if the planet is far enough away, then the way it appears from earth is really no different than the way it appears from the sun, from whose point of view that planet definitely appears always illuminated.
     
  15. Apr 11, 2012 #14
    But if you were to fly closer to mars at a 90 degree angle relative to the sun and mars. It would be phasing.
     
  16. Apr 11, 2012 #15

    Drakkith

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    Sure, but we are talking about seeing the planets from Earth.
     
  17. Apr 11, 2012 #16
    So outer planets do not appear to phase from Earth. But in reality they do, since they have day and night.
     
  18. Apr 11, 2012 #17

    russ_watters

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    If you look hard enough, you can indeed see phases for the outer planets - just a limited set of them.
     
  19. Apr 11, 2012 #18

    DaveC426913

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    Let's be clear. All planets have day and night sides, that is an objective reality. But phases are a geometry thing, relating the position of the observer with the Sun and the planet.

    So there is no objective "reality" to phases - it is intimately tied with an observational reference point.
     

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    Last edited: Apr 11, 2012
  20. Apr 11, 2012 #19

    DaveC426913

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    (Yeah. I got shouted down in a thread earlier by someone when I claimed that outer planets have phases. :grumpy: :tongue:)
     
  21. Apr 11, 2012 #20
    It is safe to say that all planets phase than correct? Wether us observers on Earth can see it or not. Outer planets do phase to a certain point in space time.
     
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