Why do high energies correspond to small distances

  • Thread starter RedX
  • Start date
  • #1
970
3

Main Question or Discussion Point

Where in quantum field theory does it say that probing something at high energies is equivalent to probing it at small distances? Most of the time things are done in momentum space (such as the Feynman rules) so we have no clue about distances and location.

The only time I even remember using distances in field theory is with lattice theory and Wilson loops, and the Wilson loop seemed to say the opposite, that to stretch a pair of quarks great distances requires great energy. For any attractive force, wouldn't it be that larger energies correspond to larger distance?

Experimentalists measure everything in energy right, and not distance?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
malawi_glenn
Science Advisor
Homework Helper
4,786
22
It is simply related to the Compton wavelength: http://www3.tsl.uu.se/thep/courses/QM/scattering-overview.pdf [Broken]
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #3
1,159
0
It is simply related to the Compton wavelength: http://www3.tsl.uu.se/thep/courses/QM/scattering-overview.pdf [Broken]
You wanted to say "with the De Broglie wavelength"? It is shorter for higher energies.

Bob.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Related Threads for: Why do high energies correspond to small distances

Replies
1
Views
603
Replies
12
Views
846
Replies
2
Views
1K
Replies
11
Views
472
  • Last Post
Replies
0
Views
1K
Top