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Would you video record the police?

  1. Aug 21, 2013 #1

    ZombieFeynman

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    Often times a police officer's work is difficult. Sometimes it is even very dangerous. However, there is evidence to suggest many police interactions with the public involve the excessive use of force.

    From wikipedia:

    The report can be found here.

    Many citizens have begun to video record their own encounters with the police, as well as police encounters with other citizens. Such a practice has been upheld as legal in nearly every state, so long as the recording is not done secretively. In several instances this recording has resulted in officers being disciplined as a result of their actions on the recording.

    I respect police who take their job to protect and serve the public seriously. I think that some people needlessly tape police doing what is otherwise routine duty. But I think that greater police accountability to the public would help to restore confidence in our justice system that some may have lost.

    What do you think?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 21, 2013 #2
    I can't fathom any good reason why the police need to be informed that they're being recorded.
     
  4. Aug 21, 2013 #3

    ZombieFeynman

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    In some instances, secretive recording may violate state wiretapping law.
     
  5. Aug 21, 2013 #4
    There's a huge difference between videotaping someone in public and wiretapping. Wiretapping means you're monitoring someone's entire telephone conversation. To group videotaping in public and wiretapping seems like a deliberate attempt to make police not have to be held accountable for their actions.
     
  6. Aug 21, 2013 #5

    Pythagorean

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    I found this, researching your statement:

    I can't attest to the credibility of reason.com, but just to advance the discusison...

    http://reason.com/archives/2012/04/05/7-rules-for-recording-police/1

    There's a bit of conundrum here, because if you make yourself too noticeable, you could technically be arrested for "interfering".

    More to the OP:

    When given authority, there will always be people that abuse it. There's an interesting paper that was written about this recently that concludes that people with a weak moral identity are more likely to allow power to corrupt them:

    http://psycnet.apa.org/journals/apl/97/3/681/ [Broken]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 6, 2017
  7. Aug 21, 2013 #6

    nsaspook

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    They have cameras recording the public, we have cameras recording them. As long as it's all done in a public area where there is no expectation of privacy I don't see a problem.

    To paraphrase Robert A. Heinlein. "A recorded society is a polite society".
     
  8. Aug 21, 2013 #7

    ZombieFeynman

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    I don't disagree with your statements, especially the portion I bolded.

    An interesting overview of the Glik case can be found on its wikipedia page.

    It seems although he was arrested:

    From what I've read, however, it may be within state law for the Police to arrest you for videotaping them secretively. Whether or not you win an appeal in court won't stop them from arresting you. The word of the law and the spirit of the law do not always overlap.
     
  9. Aug 21, 2013 #8

    CompuChip

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    Although I don't live in the US myself, I think that the police there is relatively aggressive compared to for example most police forces in Western Europe. Last time I watched a police show on TV it showed both American cops pulling over a car (with guns out, "step out of the vehicle and lay down on the ground!") and their British colleagues ("Hi mate, could we have a chat?").

    I think this difference in approach is partly necessary because the crime is much more violent as well, but I guess it also makes it easier to unnecessarily cross a line (for various reasons). Especially in this setting it is important to have rules that not only protect the safety of the police officers but also that of (relatively) innocent citizens. I think capturing their actions on tape will help enforce this safety as they are likely to be more aware of what they are doing. In those rare cases where crossing the line is required, there will always be a legal system to decide in retrospect whether the actions were correct, and having video evidence will probably also be more beneficial than harmful there.

    And finally, if I may quote the argument that the government also uses against us in order to put up public cameras and tap our phones: the big majority of the law enforcement people that take their job and its restrictions seriously have nothing to be afraid of.
     
  10. Aug 21, 2013 #9

    Borg

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    Interestingly, this story was running on the local news last night - Laurel Police Tout Personal Wear Cameras as Effective Crime-Fighting Tool. In a way, it's just an extension of the dashboard cameras that most police cars already have. However, I think that I would have to question their motives if they asked me to turn off my recording device while they left theirs on. Police often release video to the news media and I would have to suspect that I was in for some interesting post-incident editing in that case. Should society allow the police to obtain evidence that citizens cannot? After all, shouldn't a citizen be allowed to release their video to the news media? I get it that people shouldn't have an expectation of privacy in public but, by the same right, neither should the police.

    BTW, not once in the video do I remember the police informing the woman that she was being recorded. From her viewpoint, she probably only saw a bright light coming from the direction of his head. Would this qualify as secretly recording someone if a reasonable person wouldn't have known in their circumstances?
     
  11. Aug 21, 2013 #10

    nsaspook

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    Part of the problem (in the US) has been the 'militarization' of the police force. This has warped the "public servant, we protect the citizens rights" training for recruits into a "us vs them" mentality where everyone who is not a cop is a potential enemy. When a camera is seen by some (a very small percentage but they make the news) they just don't see it as a person exercising rights, it's seen as a possible threat to current operations that must be stopped.
     
  12. Aug 21, 2013 #11

    WannabeNewton

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    In NYC, there's this "Stop and Frisk" law that allows police officers to randomly stop and body search people who they think looks "suspect". Overwhelming statistics have come out over the years showing that it has been used as a way of racial profiling against blacks and hispanics.

    I was in Flushing (NYC) a few months back, and a hispanic boy at a local HS was randomly stopped for no reason and searched by a cop and when the boy resisted, asking for a reason for why he was being searched, he was pushed to the ground, beaten slightly and then arrested. It so happened that one of his friends recorded the whole thing on his phone because I later saw it on youtube. I don't know what happened to that cop but I'm guessing nothing because they always get away with this kind of crap Scott-free. Still, videotaping has its uses because it sheds light on this kind of tyranny. I've never talked to a cop in my entire life nor do I have any desire to talk to one, so I can't say anything personally about them.
     
    Last edited: Aug 21, 2013
  13. Aug 21, 2013 #12

    Pythagorean

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    The supreme court actually ruled that police do not have a duty to protect and serve:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2005/06/28/politics/28scotus.html?_r=0

    Of course, still, we should record them to make sure they don't break laws (which seems to happen frequently now that everyone has cameras on their phone).
     
  14. Aug 21, 2013 #13
    What possible conceivable reason would you have to not video tape encounters with police officers, where possible? They are servants of the community, the community does not serve them. They are there to enforce the law, not to demand obedience from people.

    If the police are doing nothing wrong, there's no harm in filming the encounter for both your and their protection. If laws or rights are violated, then there's documented evidence of it which is invaluable in any results court case.

    It's obvious why you would record police, and you have a legal right to. Most people are afraid of the cops, but unless you're violating the law, then the police really should be afraid of you, because that's who they work for.
     
  15. Aug 21, 2013 #14

    Choppy

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    I have experience in law enforcement. I held an auxilary officer position as a worked my way through graduate school.

    The first thing I would point out is that most police forces in north america (well in Canada and the US, I can't speak for Mexico) are training their officers to assume that they're on camera from the moment they get to work to the moment they go home... and not just on camera, but on camera that's going to be played before a judge/jury. Working in law enforcement means working in a fishbowl. Anyone who can't accept this, shouldn't be a police officer.

    Secondly, it's important to think about what you are doing when recording and interaction with the police and how you are doing it. Recording an interaction can come accross as an overt challenge. It may broadcast the message that you're expecting something to go wrong, or that you are going to nit-pick every little thing this officer does. That may not actually be your intention. But it can come across that way. And even though you are doing something that's within your legal rights, it's important to think about the tone you're setting for the interaction.

    Consider for a moment doing the same thing to a waitress at a restaraunt. She comes to take your order and instantly your friends hold out their phones and start recording. There's a good chance that will make her nervous and uncomfortable and that is likely going to have an influence on the level of service you can expect.

    Consider also the simple act of reaching into your pocket to pull something out as a police officer approaches. Sure it may only be a cell phone, but it will take a moment for the officer to realize that. And even if he or she consciously does, on a sub-conscious level, you could have already broadcast a threat.

    I'm not saying you should avoid recording interactions with the police. In fact, I'm pretty sure that we're not too far away from a time when every moment in our lives is recorded in one way or another. But it certainly helps everyone to be as cooperative as possible.
     
  16. Aug 21, 2013 #15

    ZombieFeynman

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    I agree with the spirit of most of your post, but in the above are we seriously supposed to buy this analogy? Are you suggesting that a waitress has a similar level of accountability to the public as a police officer?
     
  17. Aug 21, 2013 #16
    I have to admit, most of the cops I met were pretty nice. Maybe one or two jerks. I dont see why filming them is a problem but I can also see it being intrusive.
     
  18. Aug 21, 2013 #17

    ZombieFeynman

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    Nearly every police officer I've interacted with has been professional in their duty.
     
  19. Aug 21, 2013 #18

    Borg

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    He was talking about how being videotaped would make anyone nervous and gave a good example of someone who wouldn't normally be videotaped. At what point was it suggested that the phones were pulled out in order to hold the waitress accountable?
     
  20. Aug 21, 2013 #19

    Dotini

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    We pay enormous taxes to support police and fire departments. Pretty much everything they do should be a matter of public record. Video technology is out there, and people will use it. It should be perfectly okay to videotape most police activities, with a few exceptions. For instance, there should be no live broadcast of pursuits or sieges of armed suspects, in order that the suspect or accomplices not be alerted to police operational tactics. But the citizen must be careful, as most police officers by nature are large, strong men unafraid to use force. It's one thing to hold the high moral ground, but quite another to lose your teeth and eyeglasses.

    Perhaps it would be a moot issue if police wore mandatory cameras.

    But SF fire I guess is taking away mandatory cameras due to fear of lawsuits. They ran over a girl hidden under the foam of the burning plane.
     
    Last edited: Aug 21, 2013
  21. Aug 21, 2013 #20
    You don't have to film something in an aggressive or accusing way, a simple statement that "I'm going to begin recording" is fine. And if that makes the police officer uncomfortable, then really that's too bad for them... your right to defend yourself in court and bear evidence on any legal dispute trumps their getting weirded out by the camera.
     
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