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Raap
Raap is offline
#1
Aug13-08, 05:13 PM
P: 29
My knowledge of QM is far from great, but I can't figure out what I'm missing here.

When looking for e.g. an electron, it has a certain probability to be at a certain location, right? So how does *not* this allow for the electron to travel faster than light?

If I take two measurements, one taken with a tiny, tiny delay, couldn't I potentially find the electron at one spot with the first measurement, then with the second measurement find it on the completely opposite side, further away than light could have travelled within that small time-delay between the measurements?
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