Register to reply

Getting a B.S. in Physics was a big mistake aparently.

by ljackson
Tags: aparently, mistake, physics
Share this thread:
mathwonk
#37
Jan20-08, 11:08 AM
Sci Advisor
HW Helper
mathwonk's Avatar
P: 9,481
to get a job, you ask employers what they are looking for and then you provide it.

you do not sit around saying, here i am, when is someone going to appreciate me and pay me to do what i want to do?

although it might seem wrong, no one is advised to feel entitled to a job.

feeling sorry for yourself and blaming it on poor advice does not help a lot.
ljackson
#38
Jan20-08, 03:39 PM
P: 14
Quote Quote by mathwonk View Post
to get a job, you ask employers what they are looking for and then you provide it.

you do not sit around saying, here i am, when is someone going to appreciate me and pay me to do what i want to do?

although it might seem wrong, no one is advised to feel entitled to a job.

feeling sorry for yourself and blaming it on poor advice does not help a lot.
I have the skills, education and experience of what they are looking for. The problem arises is that they see B.S. Physics and not B.S. Engineering/comp sci and won't even talk to me.

Ive never sit around saying "when is someone going to apprecite me and pay me to do what I want to do". Where did you get that from? It was certainly not from what I posted? I would love to do internship/ work for next to nothing to get my foot in the door in any science/enginering/programming setting.

You have problems if you don't think someone who is willing to work their *** off and do anything to prove themself is not entitled to a job.

I never once blamed it on poor advice, I simply stated that I was given poor advice.

What is your problem?

Next time you go to give advice, make sure it makes sense/ is applicable/ has anything to do with the topic (and what has been previously said) at hand.

The attitude you give off is very parallel to attitude of employers. Just as they see B.S. Physics and assume everything, you have read the thread title and assumed everything.
mace2
#39
Jan20-08, 04:06 PM
P: 98
Quote Quote by ljackson View Post
I have the skills, education and experience of what they are looking for. The problem arises is that they see B.S. Physics and not B.S. Engineering/comp sci and won't even talk to me.

Ive never sit around saying "when is someone going to apprecite me and pay me to do what I want to do". Where did you get that from? It was certainly not from what I posted? I would love to do internship/ work for next to nothing to get my foot in the door in any science/enginering/programming setting.

You have problems if you don't think someone who is willing to work their *** off and do anything to prove themself is not entitled to a job.

I never once blamed it on poor advice, I simply stated that I was given poor advice.

What is your problem?

Next time you go to give advice, make sure it makes sense/ is applicable/ has anything to do with the topic (and what has been previously said) at hand.

The attitude you give off is very parallel to attitude of employers. Just as they see B.S. Physics and assume everything, you have read the thread title and assumed everything.
If this is how you approach criticism it might indicate why you have trouble getting a job.
Poop-Loops
#40
Jan20-08, 05:16 PM
P: 863
Quote Quote by mace2 View Post
If this is how you approach criticism it might indicate why you have trouble getting a job.
Oh please. He was criticized for things he wasn't guilty of and rightfully objected to it. Now you tell him he should bend over and take it when people yell at him, even if it's not his fault? Just stop.
RasslinGod
#41
Jan20-08, 05:20 PM
P: 117
Is this a good combo? I'm sort of interested in business. But is there a good chance i can be involved in both at the same time? Doing science AND business??
trinitron
#42
Jan20-08, 05:27 PM
P: 76
"Oh please. He was criticized for things he wasn't guilty of and rightfully objected to it. Now you tell him he should bend over and take it when people yell at him, even if it's not his fault? Just stop."

Seconded.
Shackleford
#43
Jan20-08, 05:38 PM
P: 1,540
I concur.
Poop-Loops
#44
Jan20-08, 05:59 PM
P: 863
Quote Quote by RasslinGod View Post
Is this a good combo? I'm sort of interested in business. But is there a good chance i can be involved in both at the same time? Doing science AND business??
You bet. In fact, I am pretty sure that's where the big bucks are. For example, if you become a patent lawyer, you can make some good money. Not exactly business, but you get my meaning.
mace2
#45
Jan20-08, 07:41 PM
P: 98
Perhaps I was wrong. I apologize.
ljackson
#46
Jan20-08, 07:43 PM
P: 14
Quote Quote by mace2 View Post
If this is how you approach criticism it might indicate why you have trouble getting a job.
It is not that I was criticized. It was that the criticism did not apply to me as all of his accusations and assumptions were complete opposite to what I have said.
ZapperZ
#47
Jan20-08, 07:58 PM
Emeritus
Sci Advisor
PF Gold
ZapperZ's Avatar
P: 29,238
Quote Quote by RasslinGod View Post
Is this a good combo? I'm sort of interested in business. But is there a good chance i can be involved in both at the same time? Doing science AND business??
It's a good combo, but outside of doing a double major, it isn't as easy to find a school with that kind of interdisciplinary program. If you can find one, great.

What I have seen a few physics majors have done are get their undergraduate degrees in physics, and then branch out at the graduate level, either doing an MBA, Law, or even Medicine. The Physics+Law combination is "lethal". Lawyers with science/technical background, especially computer science or computer engineering, are in quite a demand.

Zz.
AsianSensationK
#48
Jan20-08, 07:59 PM
P: 195
The original poster is probably right about not being able to do much with a BS in physics.

Employers are really particular about what they're looking for most of the time. If you don't have it, you're out of the running and someone else is in. At least, that's what I've been noticing during my job hunt. Although I'm not quite as accomplished as the original poster.

I'm not really sure, but are there any professional certifications that people might be able to test for which would make them look like less of a risk? Sometimes employers like certifications because there's a standardized way of ensuring new hires have the knowledge that employers want them to have. In finance, the CFA is a big one (although it seems that industry is in ruins right now). Are there any common ones for engineering or programming?

The only other option is to take a job you might not have wanted coming out of school while continuing your education. Sales isn't the worst option in the world.
Smacal1072
#49
Jan23-08, 04:18 PM
P: 58
A good certification to get is to become Sun-Certified in Java. It lets employers know that you can code. I'm about to get my useless BS in physics and plan on getting that certification. Also going to pursue an MS in Comp Sci
Shackleford
#50
Jan23-08, 04:20 PM
P: 1,540
I thought about taking the Engineering-In-Training Exam after I graduate.
fizziks
#51
Jan23-08, 06:25 PM
P: 241
Quote Quote by Shackleford View Post
I thought about taking the Engineering-In-Training Exam after I graduate.
I've thought about taking that test. Is it only limited to students with engineering degrees/major?
Firefox123
#52
Jan23-08, 06:41 PM
P: 189
Quote Quote by ljackson View Post
I have a B.S. in physics from a reputable school with a good GPA, numerous publications in highly reputable journals and I am still not able to get a job anywhere. Hell, I can't even get an interview because very very few jobs want someone with a degree in physics. They want an engineering discipline or computer science discipline. Both of which I'm very well versed in from my research experience and highly capable.

Yet, I've been told at least 20 times this year that a Physics degree is not what they are looking for.

I was planning on getting my M.S. right away, but I really need a job to pay for piling up bills and am thus only able to go part-time.

My advice, or rather statement, is do not try to get a job with just a B.S. in physics.

My problem was believing my advisors and online sources that engineering/comp sci disciplines would be intersted in a physics degree.

/Edit: I am so depressed lol

Have you tried looking at some of the govt contractors?

Companies like Lockheed, Northrop, SAIC, General Dynamics, BAE, BAH, Raytheon, etc.

They hire BS physics guys...
Integral
#53
Jan24-08, 09:21 AM
Mentor
Integral's Avatar
P: 7,318
keep trying, I have been steadily employed for the last 30yrs with a BS in Physics.

That is 4 completely different jobs, with state and private, large and small. The smallest company was 4 of us working in a rich guys garage, the largest is my current with ~100k employees. I know of at least 3 others with physics degrees working as engineers.
Shackleford
#54
Jan24-08, 09:47 AM
P: 1,540
I'd like to do engineering with BS physics. For what engineering branch would I be most suited?


Register to reply

Related Discussions
Where is the mistake? Special & General Relativity 18
Where is the mistake? Calculus & Beyond Homework 4
Was it a mistake Academic Guidance 8
Possible for electrons to escape this speed limit. Classical Physics 5