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Astrophysicist salary

by thinkies
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thinkies
#55
Feb13-08, 03:09 PM
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Quote Quote by BioCore View Post
No Biology is all about memorizing and understanding facts and concepts. This is why I love Biology more than Chem and Physics. Although Organic Chem ain't too bad! But yeah don't worry about the brain hemorrhage lol.
There are certain things to memorize, obvious....but what i was trying to say that i am good at understand it too. As of of now we are learning the lymphatic system in science class...and we had a test, practically everyone failed, except 2-3 students..but hey, i passed with 92% xD.....

And...now,getting to back to some sirious stuff, what do you think about internal medicine...is it relatively easy compare to other fields?
Do you know any better fields (excluding surgery stuff...=.=,i hate them)

Thanks!
thinkies
#56
Feb13-08, 03:14 PM
P: 253
and master degree is fairly a good degree right?...i mean it pays of something in 6 digits xxx xxx $ =.=............in medicine of course.
chroot
#57
Feb13-08, 03:15 PM
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Quote Quote by thinkies View Post
And...now,getting to back to some sirious stuff, what is an MD? is it like having a master degree in some field of medicine?
It's a medical doctorate. It's not a master's of anything. It's the general medical education every medical doctor receives, before beginning internship and residency. Medical school is generally a four-year program, and generally must be done after completing an undergraduate degree. Upon graduating from medical school, one becomes an MD, but is not yet licensed to practice medicine. An exam must be taken to obtain a license to practice medicine, and the exam varies by locality. During internship, which generally lasts one year, new MDs are put through a rotation to get experience with different specialties. After internship comes residency, which can last as many as seven years. At this point the new doctors are paid, full-fledged doctors, but are still receiving "on the job" training. The work of residents is managed and reviewed by more senior doctors, and they are given gradually increasing responsibility as they learn. Surgical specialties often have the longest residencies.

And what do you think about internal medicine...is it relatively easy compare to other fields?
Do you know any better fields (excluding surgery stuff...=.=,i hate them)
The easiest specialty is that which you enjoy most. Many specialties involve little or no surgery. Neurology, cardiology, etc.

- Warren
chroot
#58
Feb13-08, 03:18 PM
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Quote Quote by thinkies View Post
and master degree is fairly a good degree right?...i mean it pays of something in 6 digits xxx xxx $ =.=............in medicine of course.
There is no "master's of medicine." You can get a master's in various kinds of biology which might have medical applications -- your work may even be used by doctors -- but you cannot practice medicine without an MD (and without passing the boards).

Master's degrees indicate no particular salary. Someone with a master's in electrical engineering (note the spelling -- it's not a "master degree," it's a "master's degree") will probably make more than someone with a master's in french poetry.

- Warren
thinkies
#59
Feb13-08, 03:35 PM
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Quote Quote by chroot View Post
There is no "master's of medicine." You can get a master's in various kinds of biology which might have medical applications -- your work may even be used by doctors -- but you cannot practice medicine without an MD.

- Warren
Oh...cool
So that would mean an MD is basically a Ph.D type????????
chroot
#60
Feb13-08, 03:40 PM
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No, an MD is a medical doctorate. A Ph.D. is a doctorate in "philosophy," which loosely includes most kinds of science and humanities. They each represent roughly the same level of education, but they are distinct and not interchangeable at all. They can also differ in time invested. Medical school generally takes four years, but some kinds of Ph.D.s can take seven or more years to complete. There are other kinds of doctorates, too. One can also obtain a Juris Doctor (JD), after graduating from law school, for example.

- Warren
BioCore
#61
Feb13-08, 03:46 PM
P: n/a
simple put thinkies, MD (Medical Doctorate) is just a general program with classes and then at the end practical experience. PhD. as an actual research program where you make a thesis that you will prove or disprove in certain times.
thinkies
#62
Feb13-08, 03:50 PM
P: 253
Chroot, thanks a bunch for those multiple answers you are providing, very useful, thanks a bunch. Hmm now, what do you think of aerospace medicine? Is it a good field,beside its relevant with space and medicine...can i get a master degree in that with a ph.d degree in astronomy/astrophysics??? does that sound good....?
thinkies
#63
Feb13-08, 03:51 PM
P: 253
Quote Quote by BioCore View Post
simple put thinkies, MD (Medical Doctorate) is just a general program with classes and then at the end practical experience. PhD. as an actual research program where you make a thesis that you will prove or disprove in certain times.
Thanks, also, what are your thoughts regarding aerospace medicine?

Thanks ;)
thinkies
#64
Feb13-08, 03:53 PM
P: 253
also, what about his salary( aerospace medicine specialist)?? xxx xxx $ :P?
IM *not* being greedy....but hey, i want a to have a flexible life in future...u know .....o.0
chroot
#65
Feb13-08, 03:56 PM
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Quote Quote by thinkies View Post
Chroot, thanks a bunch for those multiple answers you are providing, very useful, thanks a bunch. Hmm now, what do you think of aerospace medicine? Is it a good field,beside its relevant with space and medicine...can i get a master degree in that with a ph.d degree in astronomy/astrophysics??? does that sound good....?
No, it doesn't sound good. I'd say (as I've said about ten times already) that you're far too young to be trying to figure out your educational career for the next two decades. You don't even know what the degrees are, much less whether or not you can or will obtain them. Chill out. You've got three years of high school left, so concentrate on them.

And no, you generally cannot obtain a master's degree in one field and then obtain a Ph.D. in another, unless the fields are exceptionally closely related. You're not going to be able to go from medicine to astrophysics, no matter how smart you are -- it just isn't possible. You seem to be drastically underestimating the amount of education that goes into being a practicing doctor, or a professional astrophysicst. Each of those careers require something like 10 years of highly specialized education. If you want both degrees, you will probably need to spend twenty or more years in a university, not making a dime. Since you seem so highly motivated by money, it doesn't sound reasonable at all.

You should also realize that in the physical sciences, a master's degree is often given as a "consolation prize." In other words, everyone attempts to obtain a Ph.D., and if you fail for some reason, you're kicked out and given a master's. If you decide to pursue astrophysics, you will need to pursue it whole-heartedly, starting in the later years of your undergraduate degree.

You will almost assuredly have to abandon these wacky ideas about obtaining multiple degrees in totally disparate fields. It isn't a menu -- you don't just go to a university and order a master's in one thing, an MD, and then top it off with a Ph.D. in astrophysics.

- Warren
chroot
#66
Feb13-08, 03:58 PM
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Quote Quote by thinkies View Post
also, what about his salary( aerospace medicine specialist)?? xxx xxx $ :P?
IM *not* being greedy....but hey, i want a to have a flexible life in future...u know .....o.0
Aerospace medicine is still just a branch of medicine. You'll need to attend medical school, and pass the licensing exam. You'll probably make a fine salary, but I'd venture it's a pretty small field.

- Warren
BioCore
#67
Feb13-08, 04:06 PM
P: n/a
I am not sure what aerospace medicine exactly is or how good the industry is doing so won't be of much help. But you should really just take a break and relax a bit, believe me when you get int University a lot of your high school perceptions and ideas will be challenged.

I have friends who constantly talked about going into Medical school, now after their first year is almost over they are thinking of doing pharmacy, some are thinking of actually going into a different field such as chemistry.
thinkies
#68
Feb13-08, 04:16 PM
P: 253
Quote Quote by chroot View Post
No, it doesn't sound good. I'd say (as I've said about ten times already) that you're far too young to be trying to figure out your educational career for the next two decades. You don't even know what the degrees are, much less whether or not you can or will obtain them. Chill out. You've got three years of high school left, so concentrate on them.

And no, you generally cannot obtain a master's degree in one field and then obtain a Ph.D. in another, unless the fields are exceptionally closely related. You're not going to be able to go from medicine to astrophysics, no matter how smart you are -- it just isn't possible. You seem to be drastically underestimating the amount of education that goes into being a practicing doctor, or a professional astrophysicst. Each of those careers require something like 10 years of highly specialized education. If you want both degrees, you will probably need to spend twenty or more years in a university, not making a dime. Since you seem so highly motivated by money, it doesn't sound reasonable at all.

You should also realize that in the physical sciences, a master's degree is often given as a "consolation prize." In other words, everyone attempts to obtain a Ph.D., and if you fail for some reason, you're kicked out and given a master's. If you decide to pursue astrophysics, you will need to pursue it whole-heartedly, starting in the later years of your undergraduate degree.

You will almost assuredly have to abandon these wacky ideas about obtaining multiple degrees in totally disparate fields. It isn't a menu -- you don't just go to a university and order a master's in one thing, an MD, and then top it off with a Ph.D. in astrophysics.

- Warren
Well, im happy to clear those many misconceptions i had...also $ is NOT MUCH of a motivatin, neither my top-commitment....

1 last questions...........=.=,hopefully, is radiology related with physics? if so,as you mentioned,if those 2 fields are closely related, i will be able to get a master degree in radiology and a phd in astronomy/astrophysics...?i can end up with those degrees the same time by having classes in those fields everyday (starting from college or w/e).
And i hope your not frustrated from my questions...though it seems like you are :(......

Thanks a bunch!
chroot
#69
Feb13-08, 04:31 PM
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Quote Quote by thinkies View Post
Well, im happy to clear those many misconceptions i had...also $ is NOT MUCH of a motivatin, neither my top-commitment....
Then stop asking about it.

1 last questions...........=.=,hopefully, is radiology related with physics? if so,as you mentioned,if those 2 fields are closely related,
They are not closely related at all.

i will be able to get a master degree in radiology and a phd in astronomy/astrophysics...?
A radiologist is a medical doctor who has specialized in radiology. It requires an undergraduate degree, four years of medical school, internship, and residency -- perhaps a total of ten to twelve years of total training. A radiologic technologist, a person who simply takes the pictures, is a relatively low-skilled profession that generally requires only a few years of training, and may not even require an undergraduate degree in some localities.

As I have said multiple times, the only way to become an astrophysicist is to obtain an undergraduate education in physics, and then attend a Ph.D. program. This is, again, ten to twelve years of total education.

THEY ARE NOT RELATED, AND DO NOT OVERLAP, IN ANY WAY WHATSOEVER. PERIOD.

i can end up with those degrees the same time by having classes in those fields everyday (starting from college or w/e).
You cannot do both at once. Your only hope is to do one after the other, spending approximately 20 years in school.

And i hope your not frustrated from my questions...though it seems like you are :(......
I am frustrated, because you appear to not be reading my responses at all. I keep saying the same things, over and over and over again.

- Warren
Vid
#70
Feb13-08, 05:22 PM
P: 420
There are programs in medical physics (LSU has one for BS, MS, and Ph.D levels,) but it still doesn't make you a doctor. It just makes you a physicist who mainly does research in nuclear science with attention to medical applications.
thinkies
#71
Feb13-08, 05:24 PM
P: 253
@chroot

Thanks for those information/tips and of course your time that you provided to answer my questions.

To hell medicine.

I will be far better in astronomy...i'll just aim 1 degree (a ph.d of course) :)

Now then, since i am keen to work as an astronomer...i was wondering how good am i gonna do in this job by 2022. As of now, positions for astronomer are verry tight! Will it be the case by then (2022)?

And some websites refer that to become an astronomer, you should do a Ph.D in astronomy *OR* physics.

Does that mean doing a Ph.d in physics will be equivalent to a Ph.d in astronomy?
chroot
#72
Feb13-08, 05:28 PM
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Astronomy and astrophysics are distinct professions. One is focused on the building of instruments and the acquisition of data, while the other is more theoretical. The degrees are distinct, too.

Think for a minute -- if the degrees were equivalent, why would they offer both?

- Warren


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