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Pots for frying?

by tgt
Tags: frying, pots
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tgt
#1
Apr21-08, 10:00 PM
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Pots are used for boiling water but what if you were to use it for frying? What are the consequences?
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DaveC426913
#2
Apr21-08, 10:04 PM
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Quote Quote by tgt View Post
Pots are used for boiling water but what if you were to use it for frying? What are the consequences?
- a frying pan concentrates the heat on the underside of the food. In a pot, the heat will dissipate into the sides of the pot, meaning the temp will be lower.
- a frying pan lets steam dissipate, keeping the food frying at a hot temp. A pot will allow steam to condense and fall back into the food, cooling it and keeping it soggy
- you'll have a tough time flipping your fried whatevers in a high-sided pot
VashtiMaiden
#3
Apr22-08, 05:06 AM
P: 28
Quote Quote by tgt View Post
Pots are used for boiling water but what if you were to use it for frying?
That wouldn't be easy!

tgt
#4
Apr22-08, 07:16 AM
P: 468
Pots for frying?

Quote Quote by DaveC426913 View Post
- a frying pan concentrates the heat on the underside of the food. In a pot, the heat will dissipate into the sides of the pot, meaning the temp will be lower.
- a frying pan lets steam dissipate, keeping the food frying at a hot temp. A pot will allow steam to condense and fall back into the food, cooling it and keeping it soggy
- you'll have a tough time flipping your fried whatevers in a high-sided pot
fair points. Most frying pans I see don't come with a lid. How much of a disadvantage is that? At least with a pot there is always a lid. My pot is very shallow because it is of small size.
Alfi
#5
Apr22-08, 07:21 AM
P: 151
wow man

I bought a lid of pot

never thought of trying to fry it though. I always just use my pipe


;)
Jimmy Snyder
#6
Apr22-08, 07:31 AM
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Quote Quote by tgt View Post
Pots are used for boiling water but what if you were to use it for frying? What are the consequences?
Fried water? Obesity.
Moonbear
#7
Apr22-08, 08:33 AM
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Quote Quote by tgt View Post
fair points. Most frying pans I see don't come with a lid. How much of a disadvantage is that? At least with a pot there is always a lid. My pot is very shallow because it is of small size.
You can get lids for frying pans...usually flat ones that will fit over any size frying pan. They're not always easy to find in the stores though. I like having a lid, even if it's almost never used, just in case I ever have a grease fire...turn off the burner and toss the lid on to put it out.
DaveC426913
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Apr22-08, 01:00 PM
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Quote Quote by Moonbear View Post
You can get lids for frying pans...usually flat ones that will fit over any size frying pan. They're not always easy to find in the stores though. I like having a lid, even if it's almost never used, just in case I ever have a grease fire...turn off the burner and toss the lid on to put it out.
They're also essential for making a good sunny-up fried egg.
Moonbear
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Apr22-08, 06:04 PM
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Quote Quote by DaveC426913 View Post
They're also essential for making a good sunny-up fried egg.
Yep, though for those, I usually use the 8 inch frying pan and several of my regular pot lids fit over that.
TVP45
#10
Apr22-08, 06:28 PM
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I often fry in a pot. You don't have to do just what the name says. I also bake in frying pans.
turbo
#11
Apr22-08, 06:31 PM
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I have a Revere-Ware pot with a very heavy SS bottom, and I use that to sear my beef roasts every time before adding spices, vegetables, etc, to make a new England boiled dinner. You can get pots with heavy thick bottoms if you look around. I have a slightly larger Revere-Ware pot with a thin bottom that I use to make soups and stews.
Moonbear
#12
Apr22-08, 06:54 PM
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If you're on a limited budget or have limited space, I'd recommend starting off with three pots. A 10" frying pan will handle both smaller things like fried eggs and larger things like searing a steak. A 1 qt saucepan for heating up small portions of things (be it boiling water for tea, making Ramen noodles, or cooking up a single serving of vegetables). And a larger saucepan of about 2 1/2 quarts you can use for cooking up small amounts of soup, boiling pasta, making sauces, etc.

If you find pans with metal handles, they can be used for baking too (get pot holders/oven mitts too!)

This will give you enough flexibility for making your basics without breaking the budget. As you can afford more or have space for more, you can add to your collection of cookware with proper baking pans or a larger pot if you find yourself desiring to cook large batches of soups and stews, or other size frying pans.
Evo
#13
Apr22-08, 06:55 PM
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Most of my frying pans came with lids.

If you have pans that don't have lids, just buy a universal lid. My older daughter says that is her all time favorite thing that I've ever given her.

http://www.amazon.com/Universal-Lid-..._sbs_k_title_1
tgt
#14
Apr23-08, 04:09 AM
P: 468
Quote Quote by Moonbear View Post
If you're on a limited budget or have limited space, I'd recommend starting off with three pots. A 10" frying pan will handle both smaller things like fried eggs and larger things like searing a steak. A 1 qt saucepan for heating up small portions of things (be it boiling water for tea, making Ramen noodles, or cooking up a single serving of vegetables). And a larger saucepan of about 2 1/2 quarts you can use for cooking up small amounts of soup, boiling pasta, making sauces, etc.

If you find pans with metal handles, they can be used for baking too (get pot holders/oven mitts too!)

This will give you enough flexibility for making your basics without breaking the budget. As you can afford more or have space for more, you can add to your collection of cookware with proper baking pans or a larger pot if you find yourself desiring to cook large batches of soups and stews, or other size frying pans.
Why did you mention Ramen noodles just out of interest? You like them? I had them yesterday and bought them by conincidence as I just bought a packet of noodles randomly. They were quiet nice actually. You prefer them to other noodles?
cristo
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Apr23-08, 04:20 AM
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Quote Quote by tgt View Post
Why did you mention Ramen noodles just out of interest? You like them? I had them yesterday and bought them by conincidence as I just bought a packet of noodles randomly. They were quiet nice actually. You prefer them to other noodles?
They're a stereotypical student food over there, aren't they?

Jimmy Snyder
#16
Apr23-08, 05:02 AM
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Quote Quote by tgt View Post
Why did you mention Ramen noodles just out of interest? You like them? I had them yesterday and bought them by conincidence as I just bought a packet of noodles randomly. They were quiet nice actually. You prefer them to other noodles?
Forget those packaged noodles. If you are close to NYC, go to the Mitsuwa shopping complex in Edgewater NJ, just across the Hudson river, a little south of the GWB. There's a food court there and a restaurant called Santoka. Get a bowl of the best noodle soup in North America. My favorite is Miso Ramen.
Moonbear
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Apr23-08, 01:10 PM
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Quote Quote by tgt View Post
Why did you mention Ramen noodles just out of interest? You like them? I had them yesterday and bought them by conincidence as I just bought a packet of noodles randomly. They were quiet nice actually. You prefer them to other noodles?
They're standard student food...cheap and filling. They're actually quite horrible for you, but once in a while I get a craving for them. I just mentioned it because that's something a lot of students want to cook.
BobG
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Apr23-08, 01:33 PM
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Quote Quote by Moonbear View Post
They're standard student food...cheap and filling. They're actually quite horrible for you, but once in a while I get a craving for them. I just mentioned it because that's something a lot of students want to cook.
Whatever happened to macaroni and cheese? You can at least slice up a hot dog or two into them when you have some extra cash. If you're really rich some week, you can even make it with milk (like the directions say) instead of just water.

On second thought, I wish I wasn't above dumpster diving. You'd probably obtain a better balanced meal.


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