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An integral for rotational movement equations

by Solar Eclipse
Tags: basic physics, integral, rotational inertia
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Solar Eclipse
#1
Dec6-08, 09:51 PM
P: 12
Im talking calc and physics in highschool right now and I was bored and messed with my formulas but I need some help now.It's for rotational movement.
If I have [tex]\varpi[/tex]d[tex]\varpi[/tex]=[tex]\alpha[/tex]d[tex]\theta[/tex] and then I take the integral will it be ([tex]\varpi[/tex]^2)/2 = [tex]\alpha\theta[/tex] or did I do it all wrong?
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tiny-tim
#2
Dec7-08, 04:49 AM
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Quote Quote by Solar Eclipse View Post
If I have [tex]\varpi[/tex]d[tex]\varpi[/tex]=[tex]\alpha[/tex]d[tex]\theta[/tex] and then I take the integral will it be ([tex]\varpi[/tex]^2)/2 = [tex]\alpha\theta[/tex] or did I do it all wrong?
Hi Solar Eclipse!

(have an omega: ω and an alpha: α and a theta: θ )

Yes, that's fine, if α is a constant, of course (except you left out the "+ C"! )

d(something) works the same no matter what the something is, and no matter whether you have d(something-else)s in the same equation.
Solar Eclipse
#3
Dec7-08, 09:36 AM
P: 12
awesome thank you for the help.


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