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Non-Interacting Particles

by Cryxic
Tags: noninteracting, particles
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Cryxic
#1
Dec11-09, 02:24 PM
P: 53
I just wanted to clarify something conceptual with non-interacting particles. So if you have three identical non-interacting fermions (say electrons), is it true that they are distinguishable (since they're non-interacting)? Or are they indistinguishable since they're still identical?
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xepma
#2
Dec11-09, 02:37 PM
P: 527
No, the indistinguishability of the electrons is also present in the absence of interactions. Any wavefunction of the electrons is anti-symmetrized. So although the electrons do not interact, they still feel some form of repelment as they cannot occupy the same state.

It's ofcourse a mathematical statement, since non-interacting particles can hardly be considered physical.
Cryxic
#3
Dec11-09, 02:44 PM
P: 53
Quote Quote by xepma View Post
No, the indistinguishability of the electrons is also present in the absence of interactions. Any wavefunction of the electrons is anti-symmetrized. So although the electrons do not interact, they still feel some form of repelment as they cannot occupy the same state.

It's ofcourse a mathematical statement, since non-interacting particles can hardly be considered physical.
Ok thanks. So basically: even though they're non-interacting, they're still indistinguishable and they obey the Pauli exclusion principle. Correct?

xepma
#4
Dec11-09, 02:48 PM
P: 527
Non-Interacting Particles

Yes, indeed.


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