Register to reply

Does new monitor need new card?

by jackmell
Tags: card, monitor
Share this thread:
jackmell
#1
Oct7-10, 03:27 PM
P: 1,666
Hi. My monitor is failing and I'd like to upgrade to a nice-size flat screen, say 12x20 or so with good graphic quality. Will I need to buy a new graphics card for that? I believe I currently have a Radeon 9200 SE card. What about the video RAM on the card? How much would I need?

Thanks,

Jack
Phys.Org News Partner Science news on Phys.org
'Smart material' chin strap harvests energy from chewing
King Richard III died painfully on battlefield
Capturing ancient Maya sites from both a rat's and a 'bat's eye view'
turbo
#2
Oct7-10, 04:05 PM
PF Gold
turbo's Avatar
P: 7,363
What are you going to do with the PC/monitor? Viewing web content, streaming videos, and playing games all have different requirements.
jackmell
#3
Oct7-10, 04:44 PM
P: 1,666
I don't do gaming but do watch videos and do graphics programming say in Mathematica.

Can you guys tell me what I have to know to go to Office Depot and come out with a nice monitor and maybe an upgrade to my graphics card so that when I get back home, I just lickedly-split pull out the card, hook-up the monitor and bingo-bango I got it as opposed to gettin' home and dang-it, this cable don't hook-up to that graphics card or one other umpt-teen incompatibility issue. I got history. :)

Greg Bernhardt
#4
Oct7-10, 04:55 PM
Admin
Greg Bernhardt's Avatar
P: 9,700
Does new monitor need new card?

Find out if your card has VGA or DVI inputs. The 9200 came in an array of options.
Borek
#5
Oct7-10, 05:21 PM
Admin
Borek's Avatar
P: 23,718
Even better check what outputs your card have

Two things to check is whether the card works in the native resolution of your new monitor and if it can be easily connected (that is, if you can use a standard cable without adapters). If you were happy with your card up to now, and you answered yes twice, you don't need to change the card. In all other cases changing the card can be a reasonable idea.
Greg Bernhardt
#6
Oct7-10, 05:44 PM
Admin
Greg Bernhardt's Avatar
P: 9,700
Quote Quote by Borek View Post
Even better check what outputs your card have
haha yes, I meant output :)
jackmell
#7
Oct7-10, 05:54 PM
P: 1,666
I have a VGA output on the card I have now. So if I just keep the card, I guess all I need is a good monitor that supports VGA. Is that right?

I want a monitor with high resolution. Should I look for a monitor with some specific pixel density or another criteria I should use?
jackmell
#8
Oct7-10, 05:57 PM
P: 1,666
Quote Quote by Borek View Post
Even better check what outputs your card have

Two things to check is whether the card works in the native resolution of your new monitor and if it can be easily connected
How do I find out which modes my video card can operate in? Maybe control panel/display or something like that?
Greg Bernhardt
#9
Oct7-10, 05:57 PM
Admin
Greg Bernhardt's Avatar
P: 9,700
Quote Quote by jackmell View Post
I have a VGA output on the card I have now. So if I just keep the card, I guess all I need is a good monitor that supports VGA. Is that right?

I want a monitor with high resolution. Should I look for a monitor with some specific pixel density or another criteria I should use?
Honestly LCD monitors have been pretty well perfected for what your needs are. You'll likely be happy with nearly any model from a major brand. Just make sure it has VGA connector (most should) and the size you want. Buy and enjoy :)
jackmell
#10
Oct7-10, 06:02 PM
P: 1,666
Quote Quote by Greg Bernhardt View Post
Just make sure it has VGA connector (most should) and the size you want. Buy and enjoy :)
Fantastic! I have the plan then. Thank you.


Register to reply

Related Discussions
Old PC and CRT monitor General Discussion 7
Has anybody here ever taken apart an LCD monitor? General Discussion 1
What kind of radiation does a CRT/TV monitor emit? Computing & Technology 7