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Einsteinís Gravity

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ender_88
#1
May18-11, 12:05 AM
P: 4
Feel free to entertain the following idea. Please feel free to poke holes in my thought
process, but keep in mind there are other ways to tell whether a balloon is filled with water
or air other than popping it. Iíve taken a few college level engineering physic classes so feel
free to post your replies as technical as you want.
__________________________________________

Gravity isnít a force. Forces have two dimensions, magnitude and direction, while gravity

appears to act more like a stress, which has magnitude and direction along with an area but

in this case itís a volume of space.

Can this be interpreted as Einsteinís Gravity?
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ibysaiyan
#2
May18-11, 09:06 AM
P: 442
Quote Quote by ender_88 View Post
Feel free to entertain the following idea. Please feel free to poke holes in my thought
process, but keep in mind there are other ways to tell whether a balloon is filled with water
or air other than popping it. I’ve taken a few college level engineering physic classes so feel
free to post your replies as technical as you want.
__________________________________________

Gravity isn’t a force. Forces have two dimensions, magnitude and direction, while gravity

appears to act more like a stress, which has magnitude and direction along with an area but

in this case it’s a volume of space.

Can this be interpreted as Einstein’s Gravity?
If you mean general relativity then no, why has the time not been taken into consideration ? GR essentially proposes gravity to be a property of space-time.Gravity is not a force,you're right that was the idea of Newtonian physics.GR is all about reference frames... one of the postulates is that: If a reference frame is uniformly accelerated relative to a Galilean one,then the body would be considered at rest due to uniform gravitational field.

Regards,
ibysaiyan
ender_88
#3
May18-11, 11:38 AM
P: 4
Quote Quote by ibysaiyan View Post
If you mean general relativity then no, why has the time not been taken into consideration ? GR essentially proposes gravity to be a property of space-time.Gravity is not a force,you're right that was the idea of Newtonian physics.GR is all about reference frames... one of the postulates is that: If a reference frame is uniformly accelerated relative to a Galilean one,then the body would be considered at rest due to uniform gravitational field.

Regards,
ibysaiyan
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The way I see it is that space is the fabric and time is the pattern that forms a uniform grid when mass isn’t present. When mass is present it distorts the uniform pattern, kind of like if a vat of molten metal solidified at the center of the vat first creating tension on its surroundings.

Gravity isn’t the force two objects exert on each other; it’s the stress in the space/time grid created by the tension of the distortion. Space/time gravitates matter in a reverse osmosis pattern, moving from volumes of less density to volumes of higher density, in order to keep as much equilibrium (i.e uniformity of the space/time grid) as possible. Almost like space/time is trying to isolate the disturbance created by masses.

thanks for your last response

-ender-

ender_88
#4
May18-11, 11:49 AM
P: 4
Einsteinís Gravity

Am I thinking too classically?
cosmik debris
#5
May18-11, 05:12 PM
P: 298
Quote Quote by ender_88 View Post
Am I thinking too classically?
GR is a classical theorem (i.e. not quantum). You are kind of right but you need 4 dimensions and a (- +++) metric signature. The Stress-Energy Tensor which describes the source of gravity is a rank 2 tensor (4 X 4 in 4D) the T00 element is the energy density, and the diagonals are momentum flow, which is a pressure.


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