What the heck is measured in m2 / s2??


by johann1301
Tags: m2 s2
johann1301
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#1
Oct21-11, 09:18 AM
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Can somebody tell me what m2 / s2 measures?? A square meter per squared second??
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sophiecentaur
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#2
Oct21-11, 09:36 AM
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The rate of change in the growth of an area?
dacruick
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#3
Oct21-11, 10:09 AM
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energy per unit mass!

Black Integra
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#4
Oct21-11, 11:32 AM
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What the heck is measured in m2 / s2??


what ever.
I ain't even important.
russ_watters
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#5
Oct21-11, 11:39 AM
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Measured? Nothing. But I suspect the question is really asking about what an energy equation means.
rcgldr
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#6
Oct21-11, 12:42 PM
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My guess is that it's the velocity component for 1 Joule of energy, 1 Joule = 1 kg m2 / s 2, or kinetic energy of an object = 1/2 mass v2 (with v2 stated as m2 / s2 ). ... or it could be related to centripetal acceleration, a = v2 / r.
Andrew Mason
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Oct21-11, 02:31 PM
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Quote Quote by russ_watters View Post
Measured? Nothing. But I suspect the question is really asking about what an energy equation means.
Well, it could be a measure of energy per unit mass (above post #3): J/kg = Nm/kg = kg m sec^-2 m kg^-1 = m^2/sec^2

AM
dacruick
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#8
Oct21-11, 02:34 PM
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Quote Quote by Andrew Mason View Post
Well, it could be a measure of energy per unit mass: J/kg = Nm/kg = kg m sec^-2 m kg^-1 = m^2/sec^2

AM
Quote Quote by dacruick View Post
energy per unit mass!
mwahahaha
Zimmah
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#9
Jan27-13, 01:11 PM
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i'm sorry for necrobumping this old tread, but AM is actually right.

Using bernoulli's equations you can find out the loss of energy due to friction in joule/kg, which is the same as m2/s2.

A joule is the same as a newton times meter, while a newton is the force required to accelerate a mass of 1 kg by 1 meter per second squared. so if you write it out it becomes:

[itex]\frac{J}{kg}[/itex] = [itex]\frac{N*m}{kg}[/itex] = [itex]\frac{kg*m*m}{sē*kg}[/itex] =[itex]\frac{mē}{sē}[/itex]

so m2/s2 could refer to the loss of energy per kg due to friction. It's used mostly in hydrodynamics and aerodynamics. Probably also in thermodynamics.
rcgldr
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#10
Jan27-13, 01:53 PM
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Quote Quote by johann1301 View Post
Can somebody tell me what m2 / s2 measures?? A square meter per squared second?
Quote Quote by dacruick View Post
energy per unit mass
Which would make m^2 / s^2 an optional unit form for potential, such as gravitational potential. For example, for object close enough to earth's surface that gravitational force can be considered constant, then gravitational potential = g h = (9.8 m / s^2) (h m) = 9.8 h m^2 / s^2.


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