Register to reply

Effect of Solar Storms on the Grid and Nuke Plants?

by docneil88
Tags: effect, grid, nuke, plants, solar, storms
Share this thread:
RealWing
#37
Jan8-12, 09:17 PM
P: 40
Quote Quote by Astronuc View Post
Nuclear plants are designed to shutdown when they lose connection to the grid. The decay heat is not sufficient to provide the turbine-generator with appropriate power to generate electricity. Instead, plants have backup or emergency diesel generators. Some NPPs may have fossil units nearby.
Some Canadian Nucs have been uniquely designed to have the capability to continue to operate after a grid disconnection/upset. At the moment of loss of grid, they immediately "step back" to ~ 75%FP . The tubine/generator continues to supply internal power and the remaining steam energy is dumped directly into the condenser. After the 2003 blackout, 4 CANDU reactors stayed operational and were a big factor in helping get the Ontario grid back in operation.
al2207
#38
Jan9-12, 06:12 PM
P: 16
were they located at Bruce power ?
RealWing
#39
Jan9-12, 08:56 PM
P: 40
Quote Quote by al2207 View Post
were they located at Bruce power ?
Three units at Bruce and one at Darlington survived the grid upset and stabilized at ~ 60% FP awaiting approval to resync with the grid.
al2207
#40
Jan10-12, 03:04 PM
P: 16
i do not know if this was tried at point lepreau or gentilly they are Candu as well
at Gentilly GE had build back-up power with 2 or 3 jet turbine to supply NPP if needed
RealWing
#41
Jan10-12, 04:10 PM
P: 40
Quote Quote by al2207 View Post
i do not know if this was tried at point lepreau or gentilly they are Candu as well
at Gentilly GE had build back-up power with 2 or 3 jet turbine to supply NPP if needed
Pt Lepreau and Gentilly II both have this capability of high power condenser dump. They are a "CANDU 6" design and the same design is used in the export reactors in China, Romania, South Korea and Argentina.
Gentilly is somewhat unique in that there is a 382 MW gas turbine plant built beside it that is used for grid peaking as well as a backup power source for G2. There are 4, 82Mwe GE gas turbines there.
al2207
#42
Jan10-12, 05:33 PM
P: 16
i had gone to both place in regard with motor control centers (Klockner Moeller )
matthewdb
#43
Jan14-12, 11:40 AM
P: 11
Quote Quote by RealWing View Post
Three units at Bruce and one at Darlington survived the grid upset and stabilized at ~ 60% FP awaiting approval to resync with the grid.
The CANDU design can stay in operation after a grid disconnect. They stay at high power at first to avoid problems with Xenon instability. The generator is only making enough power to meet the needs of the auxiliaries and the rest of the thermal energy is dumped into the condenser by steam bypass valves. If left disconnected for long enough they would eventually make it to 5% reactor power as the Xenon levels in the fuel dropped.

All current US plants trip the reactor on a loss of grid. The GE BWR plants could very easily be made to operate like the CANDU units but it would require extensive regulatory changes. At PWR plants there would have to be some level of modifications to the plants to let it happen.

The new plants being built in the US can continue to operate after a loss of grid (Westinghouse AP1000).
jim hardy
#44
Jan14-12, 12:50 PM
Sci Advisor
PF Gold
jim hardy's Avatar
P: 3,516
""All current US plants trip the reactor on a loss of grid. ""

a true enough statement in practice, though by design some of them could island.

something called "degraded grid protection" might automatically cause a plant to trip on loss of grid if not implemented thoughtfully.
or if it relies on grid for its internal power...

if the plant is supplying its own power and the control system handles the transient as described for the Candu, there's no reason my old plant couldn't "island".
Internal power was tapped right off main generator, before it went out to grid, for that reason.
Caniche
#45
Jan19-12, 02:18 PM
P: 106
Quote Quote by nikkkom View Post
I imagine the simplest solution is to shut down most of the grid when ultra-powerful solar flare is detected. Carrington event had ~6 hours gap between the flare and the onset of geomagnetic storm.
But that would hit profits and bonuses and dividends ,risky.
al2207
#46
Jan19-12, 03:20 PM
P: 16
yes there will be some impacts but what is consequence to do nothing ?
al2207
#47
Jan19-12, 06:43 PM
P: 16
large CME from sun today , expected disturbance by Saturday
Dotini
#48
Jan22-12, 05:03 PM
PF Gold
P: 506
It's only an M class. Here's a chart of ground current detected at Norway.
http://spaceweather.com/submissions/...1327226723.jpg
al2207
#49
Jan23-12, 09:37 PM
P: 16
second punch , one more solar flare cat M8 effect S3 supposed to touch us tomorrow Jan 24
Dotini
#50
Jan24-12, 07:37 AM
PF Gold
P: 506
Quote Quote by al2207 View Post
second punch , one more solar flare cat M8 effect S3 supposed to touch us tomorrow Jan 24
Often these CME's take 2-3 days to reach us. This one has apparently accelerated to Earth in under 32 hours, a little slower than expected. The magnetosphere was compressed and satellites briefly exposed to solar wind plasma.

Respectfully submitted,
Steve
al2207
#51
Feb15-12, 11:39 AM
P: 16
solar flare will be most destructive forces in future years
look at: ed dames predictions


Register to reply

Related Discussions
Solar storms and electronics Astronomy & Astrophysics 4
Effects of Solar Magnetic Storms on Early Telegraphy and Telephony Electrical Engineering 25
Solar storms ideas? Astronomy & Astrophysics 2
Do Plants Practice Grid Computing? Biology 0