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What is the biggest most fundamental question in all of physics?

by jadrian
Tags: biggest, fundamental, physics
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jadrian
#1
Feb19-12, 07:05 AM
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thanks
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Drakkith
#2
Feb19-12, 07:07 AM
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"How does this work?"
jadrian
#3
Feb19-12, 07:40 AM
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Quote Quote by Drakkith View Post
"How does this work?"
ok whats the most fundamental and controversial argument in physics

256bits
#4
Feb19-12, 09:36 AM
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What is the biggest most fundamental question in all of physics?

Quote Quote by jadrian View Post
ok whats the most fundamental and controversial argument in physics
Your question is rather abstract, so answers such as "Why?", or "How does this work?" would naturally be the answer.
Then again "the most fundamental and controversial question" might be "Where is my &^$) pen again", in any science or profession.
Drakkith
#5
Feb19-12, 04:58 PM
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Quote Quote by jadrian View Post
ok whats the most fundamental and controversial argument in physics
Physics is a huge area with many different things being researched and discovered all the time. I'm not sure there is an argument like the one you are asking about.
Randomguy
#6
Feb19-12, 05:10 PM
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String theory is both fundamental and controversial, so it fits your criteria pretty neatly.
fellupahill
#7
Feb19-12, 07:52 PM
P: 62
I think he is asking which question like. What is time? What is space? And I think a good answer to the question he is actually asking would probably contain more than one question :) As to what they are? I think someone else would be more qualified to answer ;p
fellupahill
#8
Feb19-12, 08:08 PM
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Or another good answer and someone correct me if im making an incorrect inference, would be; The conflictions with Relativity and Quantum Mechanics....
Oldfart
#9
Feb19-12, 08:34 PM
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What occurred at T=0?
Drakkith
#10
Feb19-12, 09:27 PM
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Quote Quote by Oldfart View Post
What occurred at T=0?
"Is there a T=0?"
Millacol88
#11
Feb19-12, 09:38 PM
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"What occurred before T = 0?" is an interesting one. I think questions like this are more suited to philosophy than physics ;)
fellupahill
#12
Feb19-12, 09:42 PM
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Quote Quote by Millacol88 View Post
"What occurred before T = 0?" is an interesting one. I think questions like this are more suited to philosophy than physics ;)
Ive read that before, somewere. ha
jadrian
#13
Feb19-12, 10:00 PM
P: 143
Quote Quote by Millacol88 View Post
"What occurred before T = 0?" is an interesting one. I think questions like this are more suited to philosophy than physics ;)
meh i dont think our universe needed any magic.
DaveC426913
#14
Feb19-12, 10:07 PM
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Quote Quote by jadrian View Post
meh i dont think our universe needed any magic.
Strange thing to say. Where did magic come into it?

It is a very intriguing question what caused the universe to come into being. But there's no way we can expect any evidence that will illuminate it, which is the reason is will likely be a philosophical question for a long, long time.
Millacol88
#15
Feb19-12, 10:21 PM
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Quote Quote by DaveC426913 View Post
Strange thing to say. Where did magic come into it?

It is a very intriguing question what caused the universe to come into being. But there's no way we can expect any evidence that will illuminate it, which is the reason is will likely be a philosophical question for a long, long time.
That's basically what I think. I don't think there needs to be any assumption of "magic" when the question is asked how the universe came to be, just that its well beyond our current understanding.
Oldfart
#16
Feb19-12, 10:35 PM
P: 191
Quote Quote by DaveC426913 View Post
It is a very intriguing question what caused the universe to come into being. But there's no way we can expect any evidence that will illuminate it, which is the reason is will likely be a philosophical question for a long, long time.
That seems to me to be a rather pessimistic appraisal, what is your reasoning?
DaveC426913
#17
Feb19-12, 10:40 PM
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Quote Quote by Oldfart View Post
That seems to me to be a rather pessimistic appraisal, what is your reasoning?
I writ my reasoning: because there's no expectation of any evidence to be forthcoming of any events preceding the BB.

No information from T < 0 will survive the BB. No information = no evidence. We can philosophize, but we can't make any models with any predictive properties. And if it can't be falsified, it's not a theory.
Oldfart
#18
Feb19-12, 11:22 PM
P: 191
Quote Quote by DaveC426913 View Post
I writ my reasoning: because there's no expectation of any evidence to be forthcoming of any events preceding the BB.

No information from T < 0 will survive the BB. No information = no evidence. We can philosophize, but we can't make any models with any predictive properties. And if it can't be falsified, it's not a theory.
Agree, but I was talking about T=0, not <0.


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