Register to reply

Circuit With Three Batteries Two Resistors

by shannonbe
Tags: batteries, circuit, resistors
Share this thread:
shannonbe
#1
Mar14-12, 09:06 PM
P: 4
In the above circuit:
V1 = 12.00 V V2 = 6.00 V V3 = 3.00 V
R1 = 220.0 R3 = 270.0

Because of the direction of the batteries, a student looking at the above circuit makes this guess for the direction of current across resistors R1 and R3. Is the student right, or wrong?

Find the current across resistors R1 and R3. If the student's choice of direction is RIGHT, the sign of the respective current you enter should be POSITIVE. If the student's choice of direction is WRONG, the sign of that current should be NEGATIVE. (Don't discount the possibility that a current might be zero, either!)

Solve for I3=
I1=

(If you have trouble, this hint: Note that the central battery polarity is OPPOSITE what you would expect to make a nice, neat loop. How do you think you should handle two batteries in a loop that are hooked up with OPPOSITE, not the same, polarities?)

Attempt at a Solution: I know I use Kirchoff's Laws but I cannot figure out what to do with no resistor in the central wire. I know that that means infinite current but cannot determine the effect it would have on the other two.
1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data



2. Relevant equations



3. The attempt at a solution
Phys.Org News Partner Science news on Phys.org
Apple to unveil 'iWatch' on September 9
NASA deep-space rocket, SLS, to launch in 2018
Study examines 13,000-year-old nanodiamonds from multiple locations across three continents
gneill
#2
Mar14-12, 09:34 PM
Mentor
P: 11,682
Quote Quote by shannonbe View Post
In the above circuit:
V1 = 12.00 V V2 = 6.00 V V3 = 3.00 V
R1 = 220.0 R3 = 270.0

Because of the direction of the batteries, a student looking at the above circuit makes this guess for the direction of current across resistors R1 and R3. Is the student right, or wrong?

Find the current across resistors R1 and R3. If the student's choice of direction is RIGHT, the sign of the respective current you enter should be POSITIVE. If the student's choice of direction is WRONG, the sign of that current should be NEGATIVE. (Don't discount the possibility that a current might be zero, either!)

Solve for I3=
I1=

(If you have trouble, this hint: Note that the central battery polarity is OPPOSITE what you would expect to make a nice, neat loop. How do you think you should handle two batteries in a loop that are hooked up with OPPOSITE, not the same, polarities?)

Attempt at a Solution: I know I use Kirchoff's Laws but I cannot figure out what to do with no resistor in the central wire. I know that that means infinite current but cannot determine the effect it would have on the other two.
For infinite current there would have to be a path without any resistance between the terminals of a voltage source. Can you show that such a path exists for the middle battery?

What have you learned about Kirchhoff's laws?
shannonbe
#3
Mar14-12, 09:55 PM
P: 4
We have learned how to apply Kirchoff's rules. I am sure that this problem is a lot easier than I am making it out to be but we have not done many examples in class.

gneill
#4
Mar14-12, 10:00 PM
Mentor
P: 11,682
Circuit With Three Batteries Two Resistors

Why don't you try to apply Kirchhoff's voltage law around one of the loops? Can you write the resulting equation?
shannonbe
#5
Mar14-12, 10:07 PM
P: 4
Top Loop: starting from junction at lower left corner -I1R1+V1-V2=0
shannonbe
#6
Mar14-12, 10:13 PM
P: 4
Bottom Loop: Starting from bottom right junction -V2+V3-I3R3=0
Is this correct? If so, I know how to go about solving from here.
gneill
#7
Mar14-12, 10:19 PM
Mentor
P: 11,682
Both look fine. Solve for I1 and I3.


Register to reply

Related Discussions
Circuit with 2 Batteries and 6 Resistors Introductory Physics Homework 7
Circuit help? with two batteries and resistors Introductory Physics Homework 6
Two batteries and three resistors... Introductory Physics Homework 1
Circuits and resistors and batteries, oh my! (a.k.a. I know nothing) Introductory Physics Homework 4
Simple Circuit with Resistors and Two Batteries Introductory Physics Homework 7