Can a dimension exist that is neither temporal nor spatial?


by Dremmer
Tags: dimension, exist, spatial, temporal
Dremmer
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#1
Apr23-12, 06:49 PM
P: 86
Is it possible?
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haruspex
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#2
Apr24-12, 06:59 AM
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Yes, and there are many instances. A system is often described as moving in a "state space". That ascribes dimensions to all sorts of characteristics, such as speed, potential energy, temperature... whatever you like.
cosmik debris
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#3
Apr26-12, 05:13 PM
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The number of dimensions used to describe spaces is the minimum number of independent co-ordinates needed to specify a point in that space. The co-ordinates may be any units you choose.

gonegahgah
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#4
Apr26-12, 05:46 PM
P: 375

Can a dimension exist that is neither temporal nor spatial?


Could reaction (aka acceleration) be considered to be a dimension. Things don't just move through time and space; they also react to each other?


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