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What really are intervals in respect to functions ? As defined they

by Kartik.
Tags: defined, functions, intervals, respect
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Kartik.
#1
May2-12, 01:26 PM
P: 55
What really are intervals in respect to functions ? As defined they are subsets of real numbers, for example, two numbers a,b belonging to R and a<b, so with that we can make out four intervals or sets with some variable x and treating a and b are inclusive or exclusive limits and also some infinite intervals :\. How does that have any utility with functions and what are these variables a and b for ? Please someone elaborate on this ?
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Akshay_Anti
#2
May3-12, 03:52 AM
P: 62
That means that the domain or the value the variable can take is defined from that set. Eg- If I define a set over [a,b], it means the variable involved can take its value from a to b both inclusive only. For any other number out of this set, the function does not exist.
Kartik.
#3
May3-12, 10:22 AM
P: 55
Quote Quote by Akshay_Anti View Post
That means that the domain or the value the variable can take is defined from that set. Eg- If I define a set over [a,b], it means the variable involved can take its value from a to b both inclusive only. For any other number out of this set, the function does not exist.
Thanks You .


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