hyperthymesia or Highly Superior Autobiographical Memory


by Evo
Tags: autobiographical, highly, hyperthymesia, memory, superior
fuzzyfelt
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#19
Oct6-12, 09:34 AM
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Iíd meant I donít have my books, but Iíve found some support for what I wrote-

"MEMORY & IMAGINATION
"Michelangelo has a most retentive memory, such that though he has painted thousands of figures, he has not made two alike or in the same pose. Indeed, I have heard him say that he never draws a line without recalling whether he has previously drawn it before, and if so he will erase it. His imaginative capacity is strong, which contributes to his dissatisfaction with his finished works, as he states they do not meet the original idea fashioned in his mind." Life of Michelangelo, Ascanio Condivi. "

http://www.eeweems.com/michelangelo/methods.html

(Also, the examination of cadavers happened here at the left-
http://www.physicsforums.com/showthr...70543&page=455 )

And this has shows a drawing of pigeons by Picasso at an early age, and a book I do have said he was surrounded by his little sisters and cousins in his early childhood, who demanded he draw birds and horses on the spot, as well as being a noted child prodigy.
http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/200...IDESHOW_3.html
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/06/18/ar...amhi.html?_r=0



Quote Quote by Gad View Post
I'm not even sure if I'm describing my 'memory type' well or not, but it seems as if my brain is trying to categorize the things I need to remember and put them together as if it's making its own, crossword, if I may say. The tough part is that the 'characters' are vanished [with time] leaving empty spaces behind. But the shap of the crossword is remained, which by itself helps to recall what was there, yet it's still tough... Sigh.

Btw, Interesting topic Evo, thanks for sharing.
Nice allegory, I like the idea of downwards distance in time and (a)cross references.
Nobody_
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#20
Oct21-12, 06:21 AM
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I am just a Nobody passing through but how I perceive the world in being an autistic is not to say the least strange. Firstly I am capable of storing information in a unique way with a unique way of recalling it. Ok.

My brain stores information firstly as levels, with each level drop down the information becomes more and more dense / advanced. Now the memories stored are not simply visual or basic. When I recall memories it stores them like a net / network. When I access 1 memory say the idea of an atom the atom calls back sub ideas such as weight,size,mass electron configuration and so on. Not only while I am doing this am I recalling a quantum field image of "the electron cloud but to make it simpler on my mind and so I don't go completely insane" I keep it to the "shell theory" with seeing the electrons in their energy shells / levels. Now going deeper into the levels of information I can see animations which are "constructed from information I find and learn" Such as neutrons impacting a uranium 238 atom causing it to perform a fission process. I can also see the shells in animation. Whats even more screwy is I can project whats in my mind into my eyes and see it in the real world if that makes any sort of sense. So in short.

1. I have an image memory
2. Cinematic memory (My mum can definitely recall this I can watch entire movies in my head through pure recall) If I choose to.
3. I can link sound to my image / Cinematic memory
And I can add word tags
4. I can also take images in my mind and see them in the real-world from parts to machines to even creatures.
5. I store information in a leveled state
6. I am also able to simultaneously put several memories up in my mind and watch them I can still remember Christmas several years behind. And watch it in my mind I can relive all my favorite moments in my life all from my own mind.

I am now going to leave the forums just thought I should share my story.
AnTiFreeze3
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#21
Oct24-12, 10:10 PM
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Quote Quote by Evo View Post
I've never been able to understand the people that ask how to improve their memory, it's a completely foreign concept to me. To me, memory is just "there" and you can't improve it. I now realize that there are different types of memory and that I'm one of the types that don't fall into the typical mnemonic type of memorization.
Improving your memory is actually very feasible. If you ever look into the U.S. or World Memory Championships, then you will realize very quickly that they are ordinary people who just happened to put a substantial amount of time into improving their memories. The top contenders' brains have been analyzed, and nothing stands out when compared to a "normal" human brain (ie. a brain that doesn't spend an hour a day for months at a time working on memorizing enormous strings of digits, poems, facial recognition, etc.)

Unfortunately, memory is often misunderstood (along with many other inner-workings of the brain), so much so to where rote memorization has been deemed (at least in the U.S.) to be the way to memorize something effectively. Virtually all of the contenders in the memory championships implement the "method of loci." It sounds sophisticated, but it is more or less the exploitation of our superb spatial memory skills, and is the practice of converting items, numbers, words, faces, objects, etc. into images that you can essentially store in mapped out locations of which you are very familiar with (something like your home, childhood home, place of employment, etc.).

Anyway, it's an interesting read. It isn't something that I have tried myself, but it's interesting nonetheless, and is actually very effective.
Greg Bernhardt
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Oct24-12, 10:13 PM
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Quote Quote by AnTiFreeze3 View Post
Improving your memory is actually very feasible.
This is an entertaining TED
Evo
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#23
Oct24-12, 10:27 PM
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Quote Quote by AnTiFreeze3 View Post
Improving your memory is actually very feasible.

Anyway, it's an interesting read. It isn't something that I have tried myself, but it's interesting nonetheless, and is actually very effective.
Not for people that were born with exceptional memories. We don't need to improve our memories and our memories don't work like yours. That's what this thread is about. Not that there is anything wrong with people that need to improve their memory, it's just something that is completely alien to people with the type of memory in the OP. I'm afraid your post is way off topic to the thread.

I can't even relate to someone that has a memory where such gimicks would be of any use.
AnTiFreeze3
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Oct24-12, 10:53 PM
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Quote Quote by Evo View Post
Not for people that were born with exceptional memories. We don't need to improve our memories and our memories don't work like yours. That's what this thread is about. Not that there is anything wrong with people that need to improve their memory, it's just something that is completely alien to people with the type of memory in the OP. I'm afraid your post is way off topic to the thread.

I can't even relate to someone that has a memory where such gimicks would be of any use.
Fair enough, but there was also the question as to how normal memories compare to those that are different.

If we who are in a less advantageous disposition choose to make up for lost ground, then we almost have no other choice but to pursue "gimmicks" such as the one I linked to. Essentially, there is a very noticeable connection between normal memories that have excelled through practice, and abnormal memories that excel merely because of their composition, namely the visual aspects of them both. You, and the other mentioned memory extraordinaire, describe very visual abilities in terms of recalling relevant information. The method of loci is mainly comprised of turning information into images that can be consciously stored in certain locations, thus making them easier to find, and, consequentially, remember.

So, possibly the missing link is that of visual capabilities; those who are more naturally inclined with regards to memory, at least as far as the few samples in this thread suggest, appear to have naturally what others can only achieve through practice.
Evo
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#25
Oct24-12, 11:09 PM
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I'll accept that.


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