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What are some of your favorite science-fiction novels?

by rmalik
Tags: favorite, novels, sciencefiction
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MalcolmB
#73
Feb11-13, 11:53 AM
P: 14
Revelation Space and Redemption Ark by Alastair Reynolds.
Aero51
#74
Feb11-13, 01:48 PM
P: 546
Eon, by Greg Bear.
Foundation's Fear, by Gregory Benford.
Foundation and Chaos, by Greg Bear.
Foundation's Triumph, by David Brin.
If you like Greg Bear you would love Blood Music. Its another novel he wrote originally as a short story.
phion
#75
Feb11-13, 03:19 PM
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Quote Quote by Aero51 View Post
If you like Greg Bear you would love Blood Music. Its another novel he wrote originally as a short story.
He's so good. Being the huge Halo nerd that I am, next on my queue are his three Halo books; Cryptum, Primordium, and Silentium. I'm so psyched about reading them I don't even know what to do with myself. Silentium will be available for purchase on the 19th on March I believe.

I'll be sure to check out Blood Music too.
Aero51
#76
Feb11-13, 04:10 PM
P: 546
To be honest I had no idea Greg Bear was so popular. Never been a Halo fan - I keep thinking of 12 year olds on XBox live screaming obscenities haha. A few of my friends are really into it though.

Have you read any of Michael Crichton? I liked Prey, I think I read timeline too years ago when I was in my early teens.
phion
#77
Feb11-13, 05:14 PM
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Quote Quote by Aero51 View Post
Never been a Halo fan - I keep thinking of 12 year olds on XBox live screaming obscenities haha. A few of my friends are really into it though.
Yea I agree, which is why I always have voice turned off and don't use a mic. I just like to shoot stuff in the face, haha.

Quote Quote by Aero51 View Post
Have you read any of Michael Crichton? I liked Prey, I think I read timeline too years ago when I was in my early teens.
I did read the first Jurassic Park, I liked all his films I saw; Twister, Jurassic Park. I'm pretty picky about what I read outside of non-fiction though, and honestly couldn't tell you in the last several years what I've read that wasn't science fiction.
quantumfoam
#78
Feb12-13, 07:47 PM
P: 117
I think Timeline by Michael Crichton was a pretty good SF. The whole thing of time travelling into the middle ages is really awesome! And Michael always puts the science in how the characters achieve their technology!(:
AnTiFreeze3
#79
Feb12-13, 11:31 PM
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Quote Quote by Ryan_m_b View Post
You've got a lot of enjoyable reading ahead of you
I can't believe I didn't notice this until now!

That's good to know that The Player of Games is an excellent book, considering I've been finished with Consider Phlebas for a while and would like to continue on with the series.

One interesting aspect of Iain Banks' writing was that I felt as if I were watching a movie, and not reading a book. He is very visually descriptive, to where I had no difficulty at all imagining something in my mind, whereas other books aren't so kind.

I would wholeheartedly agree that he does a great job of creating intrigue about the Culture; I was almost disappointed with how little of a role it played in the book (despite Consider Phlebas revolving around a war involving the Culture), but there was enough in there to satiate my curiosity, and to allow my imagination to work with what it was given.
AnTiFreeze3
#80
Feb12-13, 11:45 PM
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P: 251
In my British Literature class, we have been supplied with a textbook containing poems, short stories, and a few brief novella. I obviously skipped over the fecal matter inside and immediately started reading the included works of George Orwell and H.G. Wells.

I found The Star by H.G. Wells, and fell in love with it instantly. I originally had a brief summary typed up here, but realized that short stories rely upon surprises and quick emotional surges for their potency, so I wouldn't dare risk ruining it for you by giving away too much information.

It can be read here for free, and it would probably take up less than 10 pages of a printed book, so you really have no excuse not to read it.
Ibix
#81
Feb13-13, 01:59 AM
P: 378
I was trying to work out how that could have a twist ending given its mechanistic style. Awsome when it came, though.
Borek
#82
Feb16-13, 05:21 PM
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So I have just finished The Lord of the Icy Garden by Jarosław Grzędowicz. Sci-Fi that mixes with fantasy in an unexpected way. Only in Polish at the moment, but if it will be ever translated, do read - all four books, to the very end. Somehow in the end he makes all ends meet, even if by the time I started to read the third book I lost my faith the story will ever end still making sense.
R_beta.v3
#83
Feb16-13, 08:10 PM
P: 13
I haven't read many science-fiction books, but recently I began reading Asimov books.
-The End of Eternity
-Prelude to Foundation
-Forward the Foundation

I liked them a lot. Especially "The End of Eternity".
brenan
#84
Feb20-13, 11:02 AM
P: 37
Quote Quote by R_beta.v3 View Post
I haven't read many science-fiction books, but recently I began reading Asimov books.
-The End of Eternity
-Prelude to Foundation
-Forward the Foundation

I liked them a lot. Especially "The End of Eternity".
I became an Asimov reader at a very early age. I was one of those
people that read everything he wrote on any subject.
His short stories (and Clarkes) were particular favourites on train journeys.
I loved all his science articles and even his intro's into his stories.

I can recommend any of his collections as being well worth the time.
There seems to be very little he wrote that wasn't hugely enjoyable.
Not bad for someone who just sat down and typed with hardly any revision.
However I DON'T recommend his autobiography. I have 2 volumes and find it impossible to read.
That was quite a shock at the time.

If you enjoy the longer stuff like the Foundation trilogy ( I refuse to accept a 4th -
its a trilogy damn it!) you might also like some of E.E. Doc Smiths stuff -
Oh and of course Harry Harrisons Stainless Steel Rat series.
Riemann Metric
#85
Mar4-13, 06:29 PM
P: 12
Ender's Game series was definitely nice, and I must say the physics of Halo along with its novels make for another source of entertainment, apart from the action and plot of the actual storyline. It's nice to think about what humans could eventually achieve.
DHF
#86
May14-13, 11:14 AM
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My personal favorite is "Lighting" by Dean Koontz. It centers around the life of girl named Laura and a mysterious man that continues to appear at key moments of her life, starting with the night she was born. It came out in 1988 but I still pick it up and re read it occasionally.
Cruikshank
#87
Jun25-13, 09:18 AM
P: 66
Have Spacesuit, Will Travel by Robert Heinlein changed my life when I was 16. All his early stuff is great.
Snow Crash by Neal Stephenson was amazing, Diamond Age was so-so, about 1/3 of Cryptonomicon was good, and I've given up on the rest.
Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card was brilliant, and his first. That author swings for the fence on every pitch--either he belts it out of the park or spins around in circles looking ridiculous. Unfortunately usually the latter.
The Honor Harrington series by David Weber--for the characters more than science.
A Fire Upon the Deep by Vernor Vinge was magnificent, but don't read the sequels unless you like grim, grim, and more grim suffering.
The Dispossessed by Ursula K. LeGuin is mostly about societies, but the main character is a physicist.

I love the novels of ideas, and the novels of human integrity and accomplishment. Bujold and Benford and Brin are all great in various ways (currently halfway through Existence by David Brin and it is a hard but rewarding read.) I have read a lot of 7-9 on the hardness scale, but I prefer around 4 to 6 because it's a story not a textbook.
turbo
#88
Jun25-13, 10:31 AM
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Quote Quote by Cruikshank View Post
Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card was brilliant, and his first.
Got to give a ditto on this one. I have read so many science fiction novels and this one stands out even so many years later.
Skutch
#89
Jul3-13, 12:55 PM
P: n/a
Quote Quote by jim hardy View Post
Books to make one laugh out loud?
Vonnegut's Venus on the Half Shell
Sturgeon's Ether Breather tales, three of them if i recall
Except Venus on the Half Shell is Philip Jose Farmer writing as Kilgore Trout, not Vonnegut. Sorry I'm two years late with this revelation, but I just joined.
Digitalism
#90
Jul21-13, 05:23 PM
P: 40
Quote Quote by netgypsy View Post
What about some that are light, goofy, convoluted, entertaining, easy to read,funny and don't have creepy creatures, collecting booty, and fighting in 90% of the book. And no glaringly bad science please (A family member has requested some of these) they like Hitchhiler's Guide to the Galaxy and Anne McCaffrey dragon rider but funnier than her stuff.

Thanks
Perhaps Altered Carbon though it is a bit more gritty than humorous not in the realm of hard scifi. Seems to be hard to find hard scifi that is well written, entertaining, and challenging as literature


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