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The Importance of Theoretical Physics

by RuroumiKenshin
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RuroumiKenshin
#1
Apr28-03, 10:58 PM
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What is the importance of theoretical physics to our modern society?
People often inquire, when I inform them that I wish to get a PhD in it, what the importance of it is. What is the point of theoretical physics? I guess it is the framework open which microchips are built! That is, quantum mechanics is involved, right? Okay, so I'm clueless here.....
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kyle_soule
#2
Apr28-03, 11:18 PM
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Theoretical physics is always pushing the envelope, and also creating/discovering the physics of tomorrow. There is no need for putting all your man power on the now, when the future will be at hand soon. This, in fact, would leave you at a stand still when you passed from the now ( into the 'later' ) for a while in order to push ahead again, you would find yourself with nothing to work on as others, ultimately, worked on theoretical physics.

Basically, they create the theories to be tested when the equipment is available. Much like designing cars of the future, they have no real importance now, but they will be in 10+ years.
damgo
#3
Apr29-03, 01:52 AM
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Well, it depends on the field of physics. Theoretical work in, say, plasma physics or condensed matter physics has great promise in developing nifty new things like superconductors, fusion reactors, amazing new materials, and so on. Theoretical work in high-energy physics or cosmology -- like most of the stuff in this forum -- well, it's hard to imagine how that could ever be really "useful." I do it because 1) I enjoy it, and 2) I think understating the fundamental workings of the universe is important for its own sake.

wimms
#4
Apr29-03, 02:49 AM
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The Importance of Theoretical Physics

Importance to society, in this order:
- new weapons. (sorry, this is still usually first on the list)
- communication and observation (incl big brother)
- energy
- travel
- computing
..
..
- fate of universe, and perhaps meaning
Tom Mattson
#5
Apr29-03, 01:57 PM
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Originally posted by MajinVegeta
What is the importance of theoretical physics to our modern society?
Queen Victoria asked that question of Michael Faraday when he demonstrated this "useless" phenomenon called electricity to her. She asked "Of what use is it?" and he replied, "Of what use is a newborn babe?"
Locutus
#6
Apr29-03, 04:19 PM
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The theory of relativity is still considered by many to be theoretical physics. From SR we have E=mc^2. From E=mc^2 we have nuclear weapons and energy.

GPS systems factor in effects of relativity when they operate, or else they would be innaccurate.

For relativity alone there are many other examples of how it has affected our world. And relativity is just one theory that falls under the domain of nonclassical, "theoretical" physics.
FZ+
#7
Apr29-03, 04:30 PM
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I have always thought that the search for knowledge is an end in itself. The practical applications are just fortunate side-effects.
Tom Mattson
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Apr29-03, 04:34 PM
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"Physics is like sex. Sure, it may give some practical results, but that's not why we do it." - R. Feynman
selfAdjoint
#9
Apr29-03, 04:54 PM
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"Pour l'honneur de l'esprit humaine". who said that? Laplace, Lagrange?
damgo
#10
Apr29-03, 07:03 PM
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lol... I heard the electricity anecdote a little differently. When Gladstone was British PM, he visited Faraday's laboratory and asked if some esoteric substance called `Electricity' would ever have practical significance. Faraday responded "One day, sir, you will tax it."

I suspect it might be an urban legend, but it's still funny.
climbhi
#11
Apr29-03, 08:10 PM
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Originally posted by Tom
"Physics is like sex. Sure, it may give some practical results, but that's not why we do it." - R. Feynman
I love that quote. Too people who talk to me about being a physics major and what type of physics I like to study and then ask me of what use it is I've gotten into the habit of replying "absolutely no use at all, just beautiful." But then usually add some stuff to the end of it like "Of what use was going to the moon? What was the use for Columbus going back to America after he failed to find a better trade route to India. And even worse yet of what use was going back to the moon after we'd already been there? Sometimes useless things are important you see..."
Ivan Seeking
#12
Apr30-03, 06:24 AM
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Q: "What is the importance of theoretical physics to our modern society?"

A: We won't know until we're done.

Here are some of the hopes I have heard expressed: To know the mind of God; to attain a complete understanding and the eventual mastery of nature; to make really cool flying cars; to build warp-field laser blasters? You tell me; how much is possible?

"It is very important that we do not all follow the same
fashion... It's necessary to increase the amount of
variety... and the only way to do this is to implore you
few guys to take a risk with your lives that you will not
be heard of again, and go off into the wild blue yonder to
see if you can figure it out." Richard Feynman(1965),

Nobel prize in physics award address.
plus
#13
Apr30-03, 10:33 AM
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Originally posted by Tom
"Physics is like sex. Sure, it may give some practical results, but that's not why we do it." - R. Feynman
Practical results are what brings in the money for physics, but not for sex
Tom Mattson
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Apr30-03, 03:32 PM
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Originally posted by plus
Practical results are what brings in the money for physics, but not for sex
Are you calling me a prostitute?
plus
#15
May1-03, 09:04 AM
P: 291
Originally posted by Tom
Are you calling me a prostitute?
No, although I was alluding to the field. Are you?

Theoretical physics is the glamorous part of physics, and it makes so much less money than its ugly applied side. Why is this?
Ivan Seeking
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May1-03, 05:32 PM
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Hello MajinVegeta,
What is the importance of theoretical physics to you? Why do you want a PhD? I am suprised to hear of such interest in a subject for which you know of no purpose.
Mike H
#17
May1-03, 06:34 PM
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As for why theoretical physics rakes in less money than the applied side...see again damgo's comment. If you're a theoretical physicist whose specialty is biophysics, you can probably find a way to get people to fund your research and pay you to go figure out some things about protein folding, cellular dynamics & transport, model genetic expression and regulation of interesting processes, try to provide some idea of actual neural networks, or other such sundry things.

I would also be careful in not setting up a "theoretical" vs. "applied" divide. What do you call an experimental high energy physicist then, for example? It's not like they're interested in developing accelerator physics for medical treatments, but nor are they necessarily plugging away with their stack of math texts and papers at their side working on quantum gravity and the latest new trend in the field. Even if you were to set up a "basic" vs. "applied" divide, it's still kind of shaky. People are fundamentally interested in things like superconductors and the many body physics of them. People are also interested in superconductors due to their properties and what you could make with them. People are interested in the physics of liquids since they love stat mech. Other people are interested in the physics of liquids since if you can understand liquids, you can get some idea how to model solvents in biochemistry and medicinal chemistry.

Applied physics makes things that are directly, tangibly useful and people are willing to pay money for - that is why it rakes in the dough. If you tell someone you can make a cheaper, faster computer chip via molecular electronics and nanotech, you will get funded. If you can find a way to improve superconductors so you can do whatever someone is interested in doing, they'll support your work. There's the apocrypal story of how a scientist at a national lab, when asked by Congress about the value of the research they did there in high energy physics, replied : "It has nothing to do with national defense except to make our nation worth defending."
Tom Mattson
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May1-03, 08:30 PM
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Originally posted by Mike H
I would also be careful in not setting up a "theoretical" vs. "applied" divide.
Yes, I always regarded it as "theoretical" vs. "experimental". If you're in a lab, you're experimenting. If you're solving equations, you're theorizing.


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