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Atlanta Water Situation Called Dire

by Ivan Seeking
Tags: atlanta, called, dire, situation, water
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Ivan Seeking
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Oct13-07, 10:51 PM
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Metro Atlanta could run out of drinking water in as little as four months according to dire predictions from top water officials on Thursday. [continued]
http://www.11alive.com/news/article_...storyid=104561

This story has been growing in signficance for some time, and it sounds like things are getting very serious.
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Moonbear
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Oct14-07, 06:53 PM
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The most severe thing they're doing to people watering their lawns is raising the rates for usage? No wonder they're in such a dire situation! In much less severe droughts than that, I've lived places where they point blank prohibit the use of water for watering lawns or washing cars, and anyone caught doing so faces STEEP fines (and don't think your neighbors wouldn't rat you out if you were the only house on the block with a green lawn and clean cars in front of it).
Evo
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Oct14-07, 07:02 PM
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How stupid. Why haven't they started water rationing? Banning watering lawns. People are so wasteful it disgusts me. I see people all of the time turning the faucet on to brush teeth, wash hands, or general cleaning and they have the faucet going full blast while they are walking around doing other things.

When you brush your teeth, wet the toothbrush and turn the water off, then turn it on just to rinse your brush and your mouth. With just some common sense millions of gallons of water could be saved every day.

Moonbear
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Oct14-07, 07:13 PM
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Atlanta Water Situation Called Dire

Quote Quote by Evo View Post
When you brush your teeth, wet the toothbrush and turn the water off, then turn it on just to rinse your brush and your mouth. With just some common sense millions of gallons of water could be saved every day.
There are tons of ways to save water. When I was a kid and we went through that drought where they prohibited watering lawns, my parents enforced a number of household changes to save water. One of them was to limit time for showers. They started out setting a 5 min timer per person, then we got better at learning to turn on the shower, get wet, turn off the shower, lather up soap and shampoo, turn the water on to quickly rinse off, then off and get out. It gave us a little more time for lathering up since we didn't have the water running the whole time.
zoobyshoe
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Oct14-07, 07:20 PM
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Quote Quote by Evo View Post
How stupid. Why haven't they started water rationing? Banning watering lawns. People are so wasteful it disgusts me. I see people all of the time turning the faucet on to brush teeth, wash hands, or general cleaning and they have the faucet going full blast while they are walking around doing other things.

When you brush your teeth, wet the toothbrush and turn the water off, then turn it on just to rinse your brush and your mouth. With just some common sense millions of gallons of water could be saved every day.
The problem is really the drought.

"If there is no rain, no brown water coming in, we have four months of storage in the entire system to provide the water supply for one-third of the residents of the state of Georgia," said Atlanta Watershed Commissioner Rob Hunter.
People brushing their teeth with a teaspoon of water might make the supply last another month but why bother when:

It's been an extreme year of drought, and some have said the federal agency that manages the lake has continued with business as usual. The US Army Corps of Engineers releases millions of gallons of water a day from Lake Lanier.

Some of that water stays in Metro Atlanta, but some travels further downstream to Florida and Alabama.

"One of the individuals in Florida said, 'Well, we have a $3 million a year oyster season'," said Jackie Joseph of the Lake Lanier Association. "We have a $5.5 billion economy around this lake."...

...In his letter, Deal questioned why water was still being released from Lake Lanier to help endangered mussels in Florida. The Corps of Engineers said that is required by an endangered species act, and there is not much they can do about that.
Ivan Seeking
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Oct14-07, 07:25 PM
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Quote Quote by zoobyshoe View Post
The problem is really the drought.
And growth.

I believe that Vegas has banned lawns for Casinos and is generally promoting the use of indigineous plants that require far less water than does grass. The growth around Vegas requires that habbits change drastically. Southern Cal could face the same problem, and in fact N and S Cal have fought over the Feather River and other sources for a century.
Ivan Seeking
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Oct14-07, 07:28 PM
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Atlanta tops in population growth
NEW YORK (CNNMoney.com) -- Atlanta has been the fastest growing metropolitan area in the nation since 2000, with a gain of nearly 900,000 residents to 5.1 million. [continued]
http://money.cnn.com/2007/04/05/real...reas/index.htm
gravenewworld
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Oct14-07, 07:53 PM
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If its brown flush it down, if its yellow its mellow.


Also people should only wet themselves in the shower. Turn off the water, lather up, and then rinse off instead of leaving the water on the entire time during the shower.


people are inherently apathetic so people don't care about water usage until there is a sever e shortage.
zoobyshoe
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Oct14-07, 07:53 PM
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Quote Quote by Ivan Seeking View Post
And growth.

Southern Cal could face the same problem, and in fact N and S Cal have fought over the Feather River and other sources for a century.
You and I should start up a desalinization business on the Salton Sea. Land is very cheap there. We could dissociate the water with radio waves generated by the desert sun, burn it back to pure H2O, then sell it to San Diego.
zoobyshoe
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Oct14-07, 07:55 PM
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Yeah. And growth. That's an astonishing jump in population.
Ivan Seeking
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Oct14-07, 11:38 PM
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Quote Quote by zoobyshoe View Post
You and I should start up a desalinization business on the Salton Sea. Land is very cheap there. We could dissociate the water with radio waves generated by the desert sun, burn it back to pure H2O, then sell it to San Diego.
I'm already up to my knees in algae... well, I will be once I start the next batch.
BobG
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Oct15-07, 06:10 AM
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Quote Quote by Moonbear View Post
The most severe thing they're doing to people watering their lawns is raising the rates for usage? No wonder they're in such a dire situation! In much less severe droughts than that, I've lived places where they point blank prohibit the use of water for watering lawns or washing cars, and anyone caught doing so faces STEEP fines (and don't think your neighbors wouldn't rat you out if you were the only house on the block with a green lawn and clean cars in front of it).
If they stopped watering their lawns, they'd be violating neighborhood covenants, wouldn't they? In some neighborhoods, your neighbors would be more likely to rat you out for being the only house on the block with a brown lawn in the middle of a drought. We run into the same problems in Colorado Springs and that same argument (limits on watering lawns, etc vs raising rates) comes up every time.
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Oct15-07, 07:30 AM
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Quote Quote by BobG View Post
If they stopped watering their lawns, they'd be violating neighborhood covenants, wouldn't they? In some neighborhoods, your neighbors would be more likely to rat you out for being the only house on the block with a brown lawn in the middle of a drought. We run into the same problems in Colorado Springs and that same argument (limits on watering lawns, etc vs raising rates) comes up every time.
I don't think the covenant can be enforceable if it violates city law. And if everyone is in the same situation, they should be more understanding. The whole idea of putting a green lawn ahead of drinking water is idiotic. Besides, it would serve all those people right for letting their HOAs dictate how they maintain their private property rather than just governing how common areas are maintained (i.e., roads, community parks).
zoobyshoe
#14
Oct20-07, 11:43 AM
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San Diego has a weekly free magazine called The Reader and this week the cover story was titled A Perfect Drought (as in: The Perfect Storm).

Apparently the whole area around San Diego is suffering from an extended and severe drought that is well on its way to making it all into a bone dry desert. The climate used to be very good for oak trees which flourished, but now all the oak are dying from lack of water . These oaks have been doing really well around here for at least 300 years, but no longer. The water tables have sunk to depths that are way below what the trees can reach.

None of this is apparent in the city itself which not dependent on local water but gets it from Northern California and the Colorado River.
rewebster
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Oct20-07, 12:01 PM
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drought, global warming, bird flu, mrsa, or republicans?


Which one is going to bring the downfall to humanity first?
zoobyshoe
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Oct20-07, 12:03 PM
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Quote Quote by rewebster View Post
drought, global warming, bird flu, mrsa, or republicans?


Which one is going to bring the downfall to humanity first?
What's "mrsa"?
rewebster
#17
Oct20-07, 12:05 PM
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http://www.google.com/search?num=20&...+staph&spell=1

----------------

(I guess I could have made an acronym about mrsa with the word 'republicans')
zoobyshoe
#18
Oct20-07, 12:21 PM
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Quote Quote by rewebster View Post
drought, global warming, bird flu, mrsa, or republicans?


Which one is going to bring the downfall to humanity first?
I hadn't heard of that mrsa before.

Personally, I'm now thinking about all those lost-in-the-wilderness ways to distill water with a tin can and garbage bag.


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