moments-calculate centre of mass


by tweety1234
Tags: centre, mass, momentscalculate
tweety1234
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#1
Dec8-08, 04:14 PM
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1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
A woman and a man support a non-uniform plank, AB of mass 10kg and length 4m. The woman holds the plank 1m from A and the man holds the plank at B. The vertical reaction provided by the woman is 56N find;

A) the vertical reaction force provided my the man

b) The position at which at which the weight of the plank acts measured from A.



2. Relevant equations



3. The attempt at a solution

I worked out the vertical reaction produced by the man which is 42N, but I am really stuck on question 'b' ...

the answer in my book says the center of mass is 2.29m from A,

I have drawn a diagram, can anybody please check it and let me know what's wrong with it?

also my moments equation is..

[tex] 56N \times 1m + 42N \times 4m = 98N (xm-3m) [/tex]

http://www.mathhelpforum.com/math-he...p-untitled.jpg
Attached Files
File Type: zip untitled.zip (4.1 KB, 3 views)
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tiny-tim
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Dec8-08, 04:30 PM
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Quote Quote by tweety1234 View Post
[tex] 56N \times 1m + 42N \times 4m = 98N (xm-3m) [/tex]
Hi tweety1234!

That's fine, except I don't understand where the (x-3) comes from

it should be ?
Redbelly98
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Dec8-08, 04:31 PM
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I can't see your diagram yet, but your description of the problem seems clear enough to respond.

What is "x" in your moment equation?

You seem to be taking moments with respect to end A, which is good. It would make sense to let "x" simply be the distance from A to the center-of-gravity position. But you seem to be defining x as something else.

tweety1234
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Dec8-08, 04:36 PM
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moments-calculate centre of mass


Quote Quote by Redbelly98 View Post
I can't see your diagram yet, but your description of the problem seems clear enough to respond.

What is "x" in your moment equation?

You seem to be taking moments with respect to end A, which is good. It would make sense to let "x" simply be the distance from A to the center-of-gravity position. But you seem to be defining x as something else.
sorry for my unclear post, yes xm is the distance from A to the center of gravity,

but if my equation is correct i still dont get the right answer?
tweety1234
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Dec8-08, 04:36 PM
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should it be x-4 instead? Cause theres 1 meter in between x and A
tiny-tim
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Dec8-08, 04:42 PM
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Quote Quote by tweety1234 View Post
should it be x-4 instead? Cause theres 1 meter in between x and A
No, there's 1 metre in between the woman and A.

x is ?
tweety1234
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Dec8-08, 04:43 PM
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Quote Quote by tiny-tim View Post
Hi tweety1234!

That's fine, except I don't understand where the (x-3) comes from

it should be ?
x represents the distance from point A , were the weight of the plank lies. so should it not be x-3 ?
tweety1234
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Dec8-08, 04:45 PM
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Quote Quote by tiny-tim View Post
No, there's 1 metre in between the woman and A.

x is ?
Okay, now I am a bit confused. Can you show me what the equation should look like ?

thank you!
Redbelly98
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Dec8-08, 04:47 PM
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Quote Quote by tweety1234 View Post
x represents the distance from point A , were the weight of the plank lies. so should it not be x-3 ?
If it's x, how can it also be x-3?
Redbelly98
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Dec8-08, 04:48 PM
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Quote Quote by tweety1234 View Post
Okay, now I am a bit confused. Can you show me what the equation should look like ?

thank you!
You have a force (the weight) acting at a distance x.

Since torque = force times distance, it really is pretty simple.
tweety1234
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Dec8-08, 04:51 PM
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Quote Quote by Redbelly98 View Post
If it's x, how can it also be x-3?
if i want to work out the distance wont i have to minus 3 meters?
Redbelly98
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Dec8-08, 04:57 PM
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Quote Quote by tweety1234 View Post
... my moments equation is..

[tex] 56N \times 1m + 42N \times 4m = 98N (xm-3m) [/tex]
I'm going to have to wait until your attachment is approved, and I can look at the diagram, before commenting further.
tiny-tim
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Dec8-08, 05:08 PM
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Quote Quote by tweety1234 View Post
if i want to work out the distance wont i have to minus 3 meters?
tweety1234, just look at your own diagram (which Redbelly hi Redbelly98! seems to have missed)

between what two points do you think there is a distance of x-3?

General hint: whenever you draw a diagram, give letters to all the points on it, so that you can talk about them later

in this case, call the woman's position W, and the centre of mass C

and then decide what two points you want to measure the distance between.


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