Imperial College London - Nuclear Engineering


by eeeeediot
Tags: college, engineering, imperial, london, nuclear
eeeeediot
eeeeediot is offline
#1
May8-09, 01:49 PM
P: 4
I recently saw that Imperial College London is starting to offer 3 new courses from 2010 between 3 departments:
  • Mechanical Engineering with Nuclear Engineering
  • Chemical Engineering with Nuclear Engineering
  • Materials with Nuclear Engineering
http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/prospecti...nts/whatsnew10

Only a few other UK unis offer an undergraduate degree specifically in NE:
http://search.ucas.com/cgi-bin/hsrun...CLEAR&single=N

Looks interesting, it seems as tho this is a significant change, most probably in response to the British governments decision to back the construction of new nuclear power stations in the future.

Are there specific undergraduate degrees in Nuclear Engineering in the US? Or is it more just individual courses as part of an engineering degree?
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Astronuc
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May8-09, 02:24 PM
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Quote Quote by eeeeediot View Post
Looks interesting, it seems as tho this is a significant change, most probably in response to the British governments decision to back the construction of new nuclear power stations in the future.

Are there specific undergraduate degrees in Nuclear Engineering in the US? Or is it more just individual courses as part of an engineering degree?
The are specific degree programs in nuclear engineering at some US universities, and in fact, there are independent departments of Nuclear Engineering at some universities where the program is sufficiently large. Due to a reduction in students interested in nuclear engineering in the 1990's and 00's, some Nuclear Engineering departments were combined with Mechanical Engineering at some schools.

Nuclear Engineering does include/involve a number of Mechanical Engineering, e.g. thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, and mechanics of materials.

University of Manchester has a nuclear engineering doctoral program at the Dalton Nuclear Institute.
http://www.dalton.manchester.ac.uk/p...ryinformation/
The EngD consortium is led by the Dalton Institute at The University of Manchester in partnership with Imperial College London and supported by the universities of Bristol, Leeds, Sheffield and Strathclyde. This makes a radical departure from conventional postgraduate studies. On this course, Research Engineers will spend over 75% of their time onsite at their sponsoring company.
Quote Quote by Dalton Nuc Inst
Undergraduate study
There are numerous opportunities at The University of Manchester for undergraduate students to elect to do nuclear-related options as part of their syllabus or undertake nuclear project work, in preparation to either pursue a career in industry or continue with postgraduate research.
Quote Quote by Dalton Nuc Inst
Courses
The University of Manchester offers no specific undergraduate courses in nuclear science and technology as industry feedback indicates a preference to recruit high calibre engineers and scientists and provide them with "in-house" nuclear training. There are however numerous opportunities for undergraduate students to elect to do nuclear related options as part of their syllabus or undertake nuclear project work. This prepares and undergraduate student to either pursue a career in industry or continue postgraduate research at Manchester.
Personally, I think it rather silly not to have an undergraduate nuclear engineering program.


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