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Glowing liquid.

by SAZAR
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SAZAR
#1
Jun18-04, 01:41 PM
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Is there some kind of liquid that glows when you shake it, then shines for a while and fades away (mechanic energy to light without anything else needed except a bottle of that liquid)?
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Gokul43201
#2
Jun18-04, 03:17 PM
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I know there's something that comes really close and is known as a "lightstick". But it is a one time use device. It usually involves a thin-walled glass capsule containing a chemical reagent inside an outer container. When you shake the container, the capsule breaks, releasing the reagent into the outer case which has another chemical. The reaction that take place results in emission of light.

If you want a repeatably useable device, there are flashlights (torches) that can be charged by shaking them. Here's an example :
http://www.sailgb.com/sshop/prod_info.asp?PID=801
thunderfvck
#3
Jun18-04, 03:32 PM
P: 210
I've read that pure LSD crystals will glow in solution when you shake them...

Of course this would be impossible and highly illegal to search for..

Monique
#4
Jun18-04, 03:50 PM
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Glowing liquid.

The crystals must be due to a piezo effect, electricity created by the friction.. electro luminescense?
Gokul43201
#5
Jun18-04, 03:56 PM
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Monique, do you mean triboluminescence - which is a combination of the piezoelectric effect and electroluminescence ?
Monique
#6
Jun18-04, 04:16 PM
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Ah right, that's the optical phenomenon where light is generated via friction right?
Tribein (greek) = to rub, lumin (latin) = light

I think it only works for solids though, and not solutions.
Monique
#7
Jun18-04, 04:23 PM
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Mechanoluminescence is probably a more appropriate term for the question..
NateTG
#8
Jun18-04, 05:42 PM
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There are bioluminescent bacteria or algea that light up when the water that they're in is perturbed. If you go to the ocean at night during a red tide it can be quite spectacular.
Monique
#9
Jun19-04, 02:47 AM
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Bioluminescense is a different kind of chemistry, it is actually the reaction between a luciferin substrate and a luciferase enzyme that produces that light. Not any less spectacular though :)
Gokul43201
#10
Jun20-04, 12:51 PM
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This is way out of my league, but I think I recall something about a fluorescent protein, probably ferredoxin, or something like that ?
Monique
#11
Jun20-04, 12:57 PM
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Ferrodoxin is an electron carrier used by organisms in redox reactions. There are many many bioluminescent molecules, the green fluorescent protein from the jelly fish Aequorea victoria.. you have fireflies, bacteria, sea pansies, the list is long :)


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