Register to reply

The big bang singularity?

by Charles Brown
Tags: bang, singularity
Share this thread:
Charles Brown
#1
Dec7-11, 10:45 AM
P: 15
If we could find the point in space where the singularity happened would you expect to find abnormalities in space time? Is there a ground zero, where there is no relative motion where everthing is rushing away?
Phys.Org News Partner Physics news on Phys.org
Optimum inertial self-propulsion design for snowman-like nanorobot
The Quantum Cheshire Cat: Can neutrons be located at a different place than their own spin?
A transistor-like amplifier for single photons
nicksauce
#2
Dec7-11, 10:59 AM
Sci Advisor
HW Helper
nicksauce's Avatar
P: 1,275
There is no such point. The big bang singularity was a singularity across all of space at a single instant in time (as opposed to, say, a black hole singularity, which is a singularity at a single point in space across all of time).

The expansion of the universe isn't everything rushing away from a single point of explosion but rather the distance between everything growing over time, like a balloon being blown up.
Naty1
#3
Dec7-11, 01:26 PM
P: 5,632
would you expect to find abnormalities in space time?
yes, even thought there is no single geometric point.

Is there a ground zero, where there is no relative motion where everthing is rushing away?
no.

PS: it's not classical physics, either. But quantum mechanics doesn't provide the answer, either.

PatrickPowers
#4
Dec8-11, 05:33 AM
P: 259
The big bang singularity?

Quote Quote by Charles Brown View Post
If we could find the point in space where the singularity happened would you expect to find abnormalities in space time? Is there a ground zero, where there is no relative motion where everthing is rushing away?

When the Universe began it was completely crammed and uniformly with matter. There was no empty space whatsoever for a long time. Everyplace was like every other place.

Most scientists think the Universe was infinite when it began and still is. So it didn't begin at a point.

As far as I know there is no known reason that the Universe expands. It just does it.

We have no idea what it expands into. According to General Relativity if there is no matter or energy then there is no such thing as time or distance.

There isn't any edge or anything like that, so you can chose any point as the center. They are all the same.
Naty1
#5
Dec8-11, 08:12 AM
P: 5,632
When the Universe began it was completely crammed and uniformly with matter. There was no empty space whatsoever for a long time. Everyplace was like every other place.

Most scientists think the Universe was infinite when it began and still is. So it didn't begin at a point.
Any sources supporting these statements?

There was NO matter at the bang...Nor was the universe infinite when it began. No one knows whther the universe is infinite or finite and unbounded now.

For example:
After its initial expansion from a singularity, the Universe cooled sufficiently to allow energy to be converted into various subatomic particles. It would take thousands of years for some of these particles (protons, neutrons, and electrons) to combine and form atoms, the building blocks of matter.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Big_Bang
Charles Brown
#6
Dec8-11, 11:59 AM
P: 15
Patrick Powers
How big was this early universe that was crammed with matter?
Charles Brown
#7
Dec8-11, 01:17 PM
P: 15
Remarkable claims require remarlable proof.
phinds
#8
Dec8-11, 01:25 PM
PF Gold
phinds's Avatar
P: 6,118
Quote Quote by Naty1 View Post
... Nor was the universe infinite when it began. No one knows whther the universe is infinite or finite and unbounded now.
These statements are mutually contradictory. If the universe was not infinite when it began, then we DO know that it is not infinite now.
Drakkith
#9
Dec8-11, 07:24 PM
Mentor
Drakkith's Avatar
P: 11,583
Quote Quote by Charles Brown View Post
Patrick Powers
How big was this early universe that was crammed with matter?
There is no way to know the size of the universe currently. If might be infinite, it might not be. However the Big Bang model doesn't care whether the universe is infinite or not. Either way it still happened everywhere in the universe.
PatrickPowers
#10
Dec8-11, 10:19 PM
P: 259
Quote Quote by Charles Brown View Post
Patrick Powers
How big was this early universe that was crammed with matter?
Nobody knows. It could have been infinite, could have been finite. In such a situation time and space are so distorted that our theories don't give answers about size, and it is not even clear what the questions should be. So I don't worry about it much.
PatrickPowers
#11
Dec8-11, 10:25 PM
P: 259
Quote Quote by Drakkith View Post
There is no way to know the size of the universe currently.
It is possible to measure the curvature of the Universe. From this it is calculated that the Universe is at least three times the size of the visible Universe, and most think it is considerably more than that.

To show that the Universe was infinite you would have to calculate a curvature of exactly zero. No way of measuring and calculating that number to infinite precision presents itself. No way of calculating ANY number that involves measurement to infinite precision presents itself.

t is possible that someone someday could convince the world that a non-flat universe leads to a contradiction, so it must be flat/infinite QED.
OCR
#12
Dec8-11, 10:38 PM
P: 124
Quote Quote by Drakkith View Post
Either way it still happened everywhere in the universe.
The Big Bang happened in the universe?

Hmmmm...




OCR


Register to reply

Related Discussions
The singularity at the Big Bang Cosmology 6
Where was the big bang singularity? Cosmology 58
Big Bang Singularity Cosmology 32
Big Bang singularity General Physics 9
Big bang and singularity General Physics 13