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Would I be able to do theoretical physics?

by Daaniyaal
Tags: physics, theoretical
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Daaniyaal
#1
Feb25-12, 01:05 PM
P: 60
About a year and a half ago, I fell in love with mathematics, physics, and our universe. I had dropped out of High School when I was 15 (grade 10) and wasted a year outside of school. During this time I started indulging in marijuana and alcohol. Also, ironically, it was during this year that I developed intellectually and found interest in academics. All of a sudden school had a purpose, and university became a desire. So I enrolled in school again, this time in the International Baccalaureate program and continued in from grade 11. My test results deemed that I needn't take grade 10. My first few months went well in the IB system but, I was unfortunately unable to disassociate myself from the drugs&alcohol crowd. Eventually, my problems were brought to light, and my mother and I decided it was best that I move to Pakistan, my native country.

Ignore most of that, it's irrelevant and boring. My question is, would one be able to do theoretical physics simply because of passion and interest? Does one require some innate talent? I feel that I lack talent and I was wondering if I could make up for it through the merit of my hard work?
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Timo
#2
Feb26-12, 11:59 AM
P: 308
I agree with your assessment that the information you gave is "irrelevant (and boring)" for the question at hand. That leaves your post with no relevant information and the question whether you might be "able to do theoretical physics" (whatever that may mean in detail). The answer obviously is "possibly" (with a tendency towards "no" in the unlikely case that you consider that a helpful answer).
It is usually agreed upon that a disciplined worker will outperform a lazy natural talent. This, however, applies to physics students, which usually have at least some innate talent in physics and math. Also, disciplined work does not necessarily equate with what most people self-perceive as "passion and interest". So again, the bottom line is "dunno" with a tendency to "no".


No offense meant with any of the above, btw. You're also free to ignore anything I said without being afraid of offending me.


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