ozone question


by rhenretta
Tags: ozone
rhenretta
rhenretta is offline
#1
Feb28-12, 11:38 AM
P: 66
I have been doing some research on ozone recently, and I have a question that none of my resources have answered...

The following reaction is an exothermic reaction, but how would I calculate the amount of heat energy is released?

[itex]O_{3} \underbrace{\rightarrow}_{uv\ light} O_{2} + O[/itex]

where uv wavelength < 290nm
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rhenretta
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#2
Feb28-12, 12:27 PM
P: 66
Am I on the right track? I looked up the energy of the covalent bonds, and in the destruction of ozone, there is a loss of a single covalent bond between 2 oxygen atoms. Therefore the energy released would be 146 kJ / mol?
jd12345
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#3
Feb28-12, 10:50 PM
P: 260
not sure but ozone has resonating structures so that might add something to its stability and hence can effect the energy released

ajkoer
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#4
Mar20-12, 01:00 PM
P: 34

ozone question


Would not a good guess be the heat of formation for ozone minus the energy required to split O2 (that is, create mono-atomic oxygen)? I am assuming that the O3 is prepared by passing an electric arc through air.

1. O2 --Energy--> O + O

2. O2 + O ---> O3

Now, if you do otherwise derive an estimate, then you also have an estimate of the energy required for Equation [1], or at least, a sanity check.


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