What are the natural target of naturally occuring beta lactamase ?


by Ahmed Abdullah
Tags: beta, lactamase, natural, naturally, occuring, target
Ahmed Abdullah
Ahmed Abdullah is offline
#1
Apr17-13, 03:30 PM
P: 183
I have learned that beta-lactamase enzymes have very ancient origin. And they are just tinkered in the recent anthropogenic activity. So some original form must be out there. What are their natural target?
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Ygggdrasil
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#2
Apr17-13, 03:44 PM
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Remember that penicillin was originally derived from a fungus. There are plenty of organisms in nature that produce antibiotic compounds from which the bacteria need to defend themselves.
Ahmed Abdullah
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#3
Apr18-13, 12:55 AM
P: 183
Quote Quote by Ygggdrasil View Post
Remember that penicillin was originally derived from a fungus. There are plenty of organisms in nature that produce antibiotic compounds from which the bacteria need to defend themselves.
Actually I was looking for a specific example.

bobze
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#4
Apr18-13, 02:06 PM
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What are the natural target of naturally occuring beta lactamase ?


Quote Quote by Ahmed Abdullah View Post
Actually I was looking for a specific example.
He was specific. Beta-lactamase attacks beta-lactam rings. Which forms the backbone of penicillins produced by fungi. Something bacteria would need to defend themselves against.

If you are asking what was the specific fungi beta-lactam that bacteria evolved beta-lactamases to that is a silly question. Molecules don't fossilize so there is no reason we should expect to ever know the exact ancestral beta-lactam.
Ahmed Abdullah
Ahmed Abdullah is offline
#5
Apr19-13, 02:57 AM
P: 183
Quote Quote by bobze View Post
He was specific. Beta-lactamase attacks beta-lactam rings. Which forms the backbone of penicillins produced by fungi. Something bacteria would need to defend themselves against.

If you are asking what was the specific fungi beta-lactam that bacteria evolved beta-lactamases to that is a silly question. Molecules don't fossilize so there is no reason we should expect to ever know the exact ancestral beta-lactam.
Sorry you misunderstood me. I wanted to know the name of the species that produce such antibiotic , the bacteria that became resistant to that and the relationship between them. I am not looking for ancestral examples (may be an impossibility, who knows). I am looking for present cases where resistance developed (exist) for non-anthropogenic activity.


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