Do animals have umbilical cords?


by EnumaElish
Tags: animals, cords, umbilical
EnumaElish
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Sep17-05, 12:03 PM
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If they do, why can't we find Ms. Mimi's belly button?
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matthyaouw
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Sep17-05, 12:23 PM
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All mammals do according to this: http://www.madsci.org/posts/archives...9598.Zo.r.html

Quite why you can't find (what I presume to be) your cat's, I don't know. Come to think of it, I've never noticed my guinea pigs' either.
gerben
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Sep18-05, 02:16 AM
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http://www.straightdope.com/classics/a1_001a.html

somasimple
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Sep18-05, 03:56 AM
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Do animals have umbilical cords?


Hi,

Cats, guinea pigs are mammals so they have one. Dolphins have too...

http://www.enchantedlearning.com/subjects/mammals/
Moonbear
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Sep18-05, 09:33 AM
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All placental mammals have an umbilical cord during fetal development. You won't find a clear belly button like humans have (it might be more interesting to ask why humans get such a distinct belly button "scar" that other mammals don't get), but there will be a small, usually flat, scar with lighter coloration than the skin around it. Typically it's hidden under fur.
cronxeh
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Sep18-05, 10:42 AM
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So wait animals dont have to cut an umbilical cord, right? Does it just tear off by itself?
Averagesupernova
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Sep18-05, 11:06 AM
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Most of the time the cord tears off by itself. Animals that birth standing up will tear the cord on the way out/down. I have seen a litter of kittens where the cords stayed attached to several kittens for what appeared to be a couple of days. They were all wrapped up on various body parts and it was hard to cut them apart.


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