Statistical Models


by mezarashi
Tags: models, statistical
mezarashi
mezarashi is offline
#1
Oct12-05, 06:34 AM
HW Helper
P: 661
I understand that there are a couple of statistical models out there that describe physical systems. One I know is Fermi-Dirac statistics. What are the other models, what are their key features and when are they applied? When working with a system, how can you be sure you should be using this particular model.

Any clues on how these models "derived" if they were at all. Thanks for your input ^^
Phys.Org News Partner Physics news on Phys.org
Physicists design quantum switches which can be activated by single photons
'Dressed' laser aimed at clouds may be key to inducing rain, lightning
Higher-order nonlinear optical processes observed using the SACLA X-ray free-electron laser
mathman
mathman is offline
#2
Oct12-05, 04:14 PM
Sci Advisor
P: 5,937
The two principal statistics describing particles at the atomic level are Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein. The F-D describe particles with half integer spin (electrons, protons, neutrons,etc.), while B-E describe particles of integer spin (H1 atoms, photons, etc.). One major (maybe the most important) difference between them is that F-D particles obey the Pauli exclusion principle, i.e. only one particle may be in a given state (the standard description of electrons in atoms results from this), while B-E particles do not (leading to experiments involving B-E condensates - you can look it up).


Register to reply

Related Discussions
Climate Models Earth 7
Toy Models of QM General Physics 0
The nuclear models do you now it ? High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics 0