Recent content by thereddevil

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    Subsea Pressure Housing Design – Wall Thickness for Stress & Buckling

    Ahh OK, makes more sense now. Still struggling with what the correct theoretical should be, though!
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    Subsea Pressure Housing Design – Wall Thickness for Stress & Buckling

    Oh, it will be two of these: https://www.macartney.com/what-we-offer/systems-and-products/connectors/subconn/subconn-micro-circular-series/subconn-micro-circular-2-3-4-5-6-and-8-contacts-and-g2-2-3-and-4-contacts/ The 'MCBH?F' variety.
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    Subsea Pressure Housing Design – Wall Thickness for Stress & Buckling

    Here is a Ø150mm x 590mm instrument: - http://www.valeport.co.uk/Portals/0/Docs/Datasheets/Valeport-MIDAS-CTD-plus.pdf Here is a Ø205mm x ~205mm instrument: - https://www.sonardyne.com/product/lodestar-gyrocompass-motion-sensor/ Obviously I have no idea of the wall sections, but can't imagine...
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    Subsea Pressure Housing Design – Wall Thickness for Stress & Buckling

    As a side note, there are companies that design subsea housings similar to what I'm aiming for: - https://prevco.com/shop - http://www.agoenvironmental.com/main-service/custom-pressure-cases I would like to understand the theoretical side of defining the wall thickness before I proceed to FEA...
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    Subsea Pressure Housing Design – Wall Thickness for Stress & Buckling

    Yes, I can see that since the process involves using their charts. Is my application definitely relevant for use with ASME Section VIII Div 1? I feel like it is, but it appears they've not written this spec for subsea applications specifically. I don't really have an objection tbh, you raise a...
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    Subsea Pressure Housing Design – Wall Thickness for Stress & Buckling

    There will be ports on the top and electrical connectors, therefore, not suitable for spherical design. Bracing is a possibility, but internal space is very limited and I'm not sure how much I could add here (if any) as well as not knowing how I could calculate stresses involved. As a side...
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    Subsea Pressure Housing Design – Wall Thickness for Stress & Buckling

    I’m designing a subsea sensor that will go to a max depth of 600 m (6 MPa/60 bar). In a simple model, it will be made of a pressure housing cylinder and two end caps, all grade 5 titanium. Some geometry is attached. I’m looking for advice on how to calculate the thickness of the...
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    Seal rotating parts/reduce friction (hand-tight thread)

    Could you explain this point further?
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    Seal rotating parts/reduce friction (hand-tight thread)

    That is a very good point with the deformation! I've no experience with PTFE coated o-rings - could be worth testing.
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    Seal rotating parts/reduce friction (hand-tight thread)

    I would like to have the entire assembly captive so that there's no chance of losing the parts (why there's a shoulder and a dowel pin either side of the threaded part). The centre piece must align with the block so that can't be threaded. You've sparked one idea: move the piston o-ring from...
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    Seal rotating parts/reduce friction (hand-tight thread)

    I am working on a design where I have a block which has a cap assembly fitted to it - see images attached. The cap assembly is constructed of: - Main body with two holes through (flowing water in and out) - Locking ring with a threaded outside, grooves for tightening by hand and two o-rings...
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    Seawater sample temperature control – heat exchanger design

    Any further input? Thanks in advance!
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    Seawater sample temperature control – heat exchanger design

    When I say block, I mean the entire metal section. The yellow section you've highlighted - is this distance something I should reduce in order to get faster temperature change? I want to hold the temperature constant and then run experiments on the sample at that temperature. When the temp is...
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    Seawater sample temperature control – heat exchanger design

    My apologies, my initial diagram was an early concept simplification - see attached for a better reason for having a glass tube. Essentially, all four bores are for optical purposes, with LEDs behind them. We had a previous product using the glass tube, but without the need for thermal control...
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    Seawater sample temperature control – heat exchanger design

    Sorry, the design was a simplification. The reason it is a tube is that at various angles in the block, there will be bores machines with light emitting into the glass tube, therefore, the block cannot be in a membrane or balloon. For this example, the seawater sample is only in the position...
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