Recent content by zahbaz

  1. Z

    Which of these is most relevant to photonics research?

    I have been assigned to research one of three topics as a term paper. This is for an upper level undergraduate course in electromagnetism. Could you advise me on which topic best aligns with research in photonics? Hall Effect: Research the classical, quantum, and anomalous Hall effect...
  2. Z

    Why do most formulas in physics have integer exponents?

    Also, a lot of formulas do not have integer exponents. Radicals are fairly common. But what would you rather read: $$K = \frac{1}{2}mv^2$$ or $$v = \sqrt{\frac{2K}{m}}$$ ? Perhaps the refined question would be, "why not irrational exponents?"
  3. Z

    Why do most formulas in physics have integer exponents?

    I think a good read, if you haven't done so yet, would be Feynman's lectures. He often addresses these issues. Lectures 9 and 10 on dynamics come to mind. http://www.feynmanlectures.caltech.edu/I_toc.html
  4. Z

    Vector Line Integral

    That's what I got from the non-Stokes approach: ∫F dot c'(t) dt from [0,2pi] = -16pi ------- Not sure if you've used Wolfram Alpha before, but it serves as a great check on your integration. This particular integral was a bit, erm, long for the free service, but the answer -50.26...
  5. Z

    Gravitational fields

    Oh okay... So gravitational intensity is gravitational force per unit mass... otherwise stated as F/m. We know gravitational force is GmM/r^2, so therefore gravitational intensity is GM/r^2. Which is... ta dah! The same thing we had before! Yeah, I'm not sure what digits were used in the...
  6. Z

    Gravitational fields

    What is this gravitational intensity you keep bringing up? PS... I edited my post in the time you replied. I had made a calc error. I got a = 2.79 m/s^2, which is pretty close to 2.60m/s^2. I'm wondering if your book has different, perhaps rounded values for Saturn's mass and radius.
  7. Z

    Gravitational fields

    What's the book's answer? I was anticipating the reasoning you said you followed. Below I pulled Saturn's mass and radius from Google, thought if it's a book problem, I'm sure your text has similar values printed inside. mv^2/r = GmM/r^2 v^2/r = GM/r^2 where M = mass of saturn = 568.3 x...
  8. Z

    Confirming my answer

    Ohh... yeah, that's a totally correct assumption. I misread the scenario! I got the same answer, 9.77... but not sure where you have the Ma term as haruspex mentioned. If you consider the mass is falling with F = ma, how much tension remains on the line? This is a downwards force on the...
  9. Z

    Gravitational fields

    Well, you have two masses to consider, the satellite's mass and Saturn's mass. After you make some cancellations in your equations, you may not need both values, though. Anyway, if this satellite is in orbit, it's experiencing a centripetal force. The real question: what force IS PROVIDING...
  10. Z

    Calculate the Work

    ^what he or she said. Which is, coincidentally, a very useful result of path independence!
  11. Z

    Vector Line Integral

    Looks correct to me. The integral isn't as evil as it appears. I tried to integrate the four final terms separately... For three of the terms, it seems that with a bit of w-substitution, you should be able to redefine the bounds to a form where you won't need to evaluate the integral at all. An...
Top