What is Harmonic frequency: Definition and 11 Discussions

A harmonic is any member of the harmonic series. The term is employed in various disciplines, including music, physics, acoustics, electronic power transmission, radio technology, and other fields. It is typically applied to repeating signals, such as sinusoidal waves. A harmonic is a wave with a frequency that is a positive integer multiple of the frequency of the original wave, known as the fundamental frequency. The original wave is also called the 1st harmonic, the following harmonics are known as higher harmonics. As all harmonics are periodic at the fundamental frequency, the sum of harmonics is also periodic at that frequency. For example, if the fundamental frequency is 50 Hz, a common AC power supply frequency, the frequencies of the first three higher harmonics are 100 Hz (2nd harmonic), 150 Hz (3rd harmonic), 200 Hz (4th harmonic) and any addition of waves with these frequencies is periodic at 50 Hz.

An nth characteristic mode, for n > 1, will have nodes that are not vibrating. For example, the 3rd characteristic mode will have nodes at






1
3





{\displaystyle {\tfrac {1}{3}}}
L and






2
3





{\displaystyle {\tfrac {2}{3}}}
L, where L is the length of the string. In fact, each nth characteristic mode, for n not a multiple of 3, will not have nodes at these points. These other characteristic modes will be vibrating at the positions






1
3





{\displaystyle {\tfrac {1}{3}}}
L and






2
3





{\displaystyle {\tfrac {2}{3}}}
L. If the player gently touches one of these positions, then these other characteristic modes will be suppressed. The tonal harmonics from these other characteristic modes will then also be suppressed. Consequently, the tonal harmonics from the nth characteristic modes, where n is a multiple of 3, will be made relatively more prominent.
In music, harmonics are used on string instruments and wind instruments as a way of producing sound on the instrument, particularly to play higher notes and, with strings, obtain notes that have a unique sound quality or "tone colour". On strings, bowed harmonics have a "glassy", pure tone. On stringed instruments, harmonics are played by touching (but not fully pressing down the string) at an exact point on the string while sounding the string (plucking, bowing, etc.); this allows the harmonic to sound, a pitch which is always higher than the fundamental frequency of the string.

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  1. novera

    Seemingly simple Physics 2 wave question (third harmonic frequency)

    I cannot find the correct answer anywhere online and the answer I keep getting is 5.4 (incorrect) Please show me the process to get to the answer! Thank you
  2. A

    Which Frequency is NOT Possible for a Vibrating String?

    Homework Statement A string (m = 1 kg) fixed at both ends is vibrating in its second harmonic mode. If the length of the string is 2 m and it feels 50 N of tension, which of the following is NOT a possible harmonic frequency for this string? a) 1.25 Hz b) 2.5 Hz c) 5 Hz d) 10 Hz e) 20 Hz...
  3. bahtiyar

    What factors affect the frequency of harmonics in a soda bottle?

    I saw a question "If you blow across the open end of a soda bottle and produce a tone of 250 Hz, what will be the frequency of the next harmonic heard if you blow much harder?" the answer is 750 Hz but I'm curious about "if you blow much harder" part, is it really depends on how much harder...
  4. DeathbyGreen

    I Finding Harmonic Relationships Between Frequencies in Experimental Data

    I'm trying to relate some different frequencies together in an experiment. Say I have 3 different frequencies, \omega_1,\omega_2, \omega_3. Omega 3 is the large envelope, and the other two must fit inside of it, and so they are integer multiples of each other. Is there some way to express...
  5. hiver

    Finding the value of g using 2nd Harmonic Frequency

    Homework Statement As the captain of the scientific team sent to Planet Physics, one of your tasks is to measure g. You have a long, thin wire labeled 1.80 g/m and a 1.30 kg weight. You have your accurate space cadet chronometer but, unfortunately, you seem to have forgotten a meter stick...
  6. goonking

    What is the length of a vibrating metal wire at its third harmonic frequency?

    Homework Statement A metal wire is vibrating at its third-harmonic frequency. 0.32 m from one end, the amplitude is equal to one quarter the maximum amplitude. Find the length of the wire. Homework EquationsThe Attempt at a Solution I don't quite understand the question, it says 0.32m from one...
  7. T

    Determining Harmonic Frequency of 1m Pipe

    Homework Statement A pipe has a length of 1 m. Determine the frequency of the first harmonic if the pipe is open at each end. The velocity of sound in air is 343 m/s. Answer in units of Hz Homework Equations f = v/2L The Attempt at a Solution I just did another problem like...
  8. T

    Calculating Length of Stretched Wire from Frequency

    Homework Statement The second harmonic frequency on a stretched wire, with a tension of 50 N and a mass per unit length density of 0.025 kg m-1, is measured to be 200 Hz. What is the length of the wire? Homework Equations L=λ/2 The Attempt at a Solution As far as I've discovered i...
  9. V

    Determining g from harmonic frequency and a pendulum

    Homework Statement As the captain of the scientific team sent to Planet Physics, one of your tasks is to measure g. You have a long, thin wire labeled 1.83g/m and a 1.21 kg weight. You have your accurate space cadet chronometer but, unfortunately, you seem to have forgotten a meter stick...
  10. R

    Simple harmonic frequency clarification

    A massless spring with spring constant 23.5 N/m hangs vertically. A body of mass 0.30 kg is attached to its free end and then released. Assume that the spring was unstretched before the body was released. What is the frequency of oscillation of the resulting motion, assumed to be simple...
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