Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Active Galaxies and the Unified Model

  1. Nov 22, 2012 #1
    Dear all,

    I'm a first year undergraduate student and I've been set an essay on the title of the post. I would be very grateful if someone could explain in layman's terms what these things are, and also if someone could tell me where I can find more information on them, preferably in an easy-to-read format.

    Thanks in advance
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 22, 2012 #2

    Drakkith

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Well, what do you already know about them? Have you searched google/wikipedia for them yet?
     
  4. Nov 22, 2012 #3
    Sorry I should have said.

    I've done some googling and looked at a few websites and books. My understanding so far is that they are galaxies which are emitting abnormal amounts of electromagnetic radiation, which some astrophysicists think is caused by a black hole at the centre of said galaxies consuming the matter surrounding it and releasing the energy in the form of jets.

    I don't understand how the jets form however.

    Also, I've never written a real scientific essay before so if anyone has tips that'd be great.

    For those that know how to write them: how does quoting other people's research work?
    Do I need to put in the citation number e.g. blah blah blah [2], after every bit of research that I reference? Or do I just put it in once, even if I refer back to the same reference later on in the essay?

    Apologies if what I wrote is a little confusing, I don't know how to word it properly.
     
  5. Nov 22, 2012 #4

    Drakkith

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

  6. Nov 22, 2012 #5

    Chronos

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Quoting other peoples work in your own paper works much the same as citing court cases in a legal brief, if that helps.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook