Alkene vs Alkyne: Hydrocarbon Bonding

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In summary, a hydrocarbon with both double and triple bonds would be considered both an alkene and an alkyne. And no, an aromatic ring hydrocarbon with all single bonds is not possible as it would not meet the requirements for aromaticity. So the short answer is no.
  • #1
ldv1452
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Would a hydrocarbon with both double and triple bonds be considered just an alkyne...or both an alkene and alkyne?
 
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  • #3
Ygggdrasil said:
Both an alkene and an alkyne.

Thanks. Also, is an aromatic ring hydrocarbon with all single bonds considered saturated?
 
  • #4
I don't think there is such a thing as an aromatic ring with all single bonds. One of the requirements for aromaticity is each atom having overlapping p orbitals on both sides, which results in double bonds.

So short answer, no.
 
  • #5
pzona said:
I don't think there is such a thing as an aromatic ring with all single bonds. One of the requirements for aromaticity is each atom having overlapping p orbitals on both sides, which results in double bonds.

So short answer, no.

Thanks for the reply.
 

Related to Alkene vs Alkyne: Hydrocarbon Bonding

1. What is the main difference between an alkene and an alkyne?

The main difference between an alkene and an alkyne is the presence of at least one double bond in an alkene and at least one triple bond in an alkyne. This difference in bonding structure leads to different chemical and physical properties.

2. Which type of hydrocarbon is more reactive: alkene or alkyne?

Alkynes are more reactive than alkenes due to the presence of a triple bond, which is easier to break compared to a double bond. This makes alkyne molecules more susceptible to undergoing addition reactions.

3. Can you provide an example of a common alkene and a common alkyne?

Ethene, also known as ethylene, is a common alkene that is used in the production of plastics and as a plant hormone. Acetylene, also known as ethyne, is a common alkyne that is used in welding and as a starting material for the production of various chemicals.

4. How do the melting and boiling points of alkenes and alkynes compare?

Generally, alkenes have lower melting and boiling points compared to alkynes. This is because alkenes have weaker intermolecular forces due to the presence of only one double bond, while alkynes have stronger intermolecular forces due to the presence of a triple bond.

5. Can alkenes and alkynes undergo similar reactions?

Yes, both alkenes and alkynes can undergo similar reactions, such as addition reactions, where atoms or groups of atoms are added to the double or triple bond. However, alkynes tend to undergo reactions at a faster rate due to their higher reactivity.

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