Are fumes from burned rubber bands toxic?

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  • #1
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Summary:

I might have accidentally cooked a rubber band in my rice cooker. Is it still safe to use?
Hi everyone

I think I might have cooked a rubber band that got stuck to the bottom of the bowl of my rice cooker. The rice didn't smell of fumes, and I ate it before noticing the burned bit on the bottom of the bowl. I'm not sure it's a rubber band, but it was very sticky and not crispy like burned rice would be.

I've managed to remove most, but not all of the burned bit from the bowl and heating element of the cooker. Is my rice cooker safe to use again or should I just buy a new one?

Thanks
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
.Scott
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My wife (the family expert on this matter) says that she would scrape it off with a razor blade and clean it.

I would be tempted to heat it up to cook off any residue as well.
 
  • #3
symbolipoint
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YES.

Note, I saw just the question of the subject. That is what I answered; not the discussion part of your post.

Note too, I saw further posts; excuse me for my toxicology knowledge being only very simplistic.
 
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  • #4
.Scott
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With specific regard to the fumes, basic rubber is an isoprene polymer. The combustion products include CO (carbon monoxide). However, to paraphrase Paracelsus (1538): only the dose makes the poison. One rubber band worth of CO will do nothing. And incidental ingestion of the charred remnants of one rubber band is very unlikely to have consequences.
 
  • #5
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Thanks. The heating element has grooves, so it'll be hard to completely remove the rubber. I think I'll try cook off the rest just to be sure.
 
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  • #6
Tom.G
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Try this ONLY if you are working on metal surfaces!
Heat to above the boiling point of water. Drop or spray water on it, a very small amount is needed. The steam explosion will remove just about anything organic.
Avoid any glass, ceramic, or porcelain, it can shatter.

It's the combination of the high reactivity of steam, the mechanical shock of the steam flash-vaporizing, and the sudden dimensional change of the metal when cooled.

Also highly recommended for cleaning ovens without the usual chemicals. Using a pump squirt bottle to hit the crusty buildup works well in a 350F (175C) oven, the hotter the better. Turn off the heat before squirting.
Be sure to avoid any electrical heating elements, the thermal shock is hard on them.

Cheers,
Tom

p.s. Got major points with my wife when I told her about this method.
 
  • #7
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Cheers. Thanks
 

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