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Article about making physics degree more employable

  1. Feb 22, 2009 #1
    what do you guys think of this?
    http://physicspost.com/articles.php?articleId=211&page=2 [Broken]

    that part where he said that if you want to go into mechanical engineering, you should spend another semester taking mechE classes

    the problem i'm having is that, since i go by the quarter/trimester system, and only need 4 classes each to complete my applied math and physics B.S. degrees, i dont really have room to take mechE classes. also, if i were to go into mechE, i would get at least a M.S., so i could always take those mechE classes as a grad student, right?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 23, 2009 #2

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    I didn't get that from the article at all. I would think that if you want to go into mechanical engineering, you should major in mechanical engineering.
     
  4. Feb 23, 2009 #3


    Makes the most sense.
     
  5. Feb 23, 2009 #4
    i meant if one is almost done with college, hence its too late to major in mechanical engineering
     
  6. Feb 24, 2009 #5

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    If you want to be a mechanical engineer, and haven't taken enough mechanical engineering courses, you're not "almost done with college", are you?
     
  7. Feb 24, 2009 #6
    yes, i'm almost done as i only need 4 more classes to complete the physics major
     
  8. Feb 24, 2009 #7

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    I think you're missing my point. My point is that you are in college to learn, not to finish on some timetable. If you want to learn mechanical engineering, and need N more classes to get a BSME degree, you need N more classes to get a BSME degree. Whether or not you need fewer than N classes to get some other degree is simply not relevant.
     
  9. Feb 24, 2009 #8
    I tend to agree with the OP that another option is to apply to master's programs in mechanical engineering (if the student is resourceful, he/she might find funding for this). at his point, to get PE certification, you need an BS in an accredited engineering program, but I believe it's in the works to eventually (2012?) Allow individuals with a science degree and ~30 credits in MS-level engineering coursework (or the MS degree itself) to apply for the Professional Engineer licensure.

    I'd still think that at this point it'd be advisable for the OP to take a few mechanical engineering classes at the BS-level... to give himself/herself a bit of background in the field AND make sure it's really the career path that he/she would like to pursue. Perhaps it's be best to do this and drop one of the majors (applied math & physics) down to a minor.
     
  10. Feb 24, 2009 #9

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    I'm not so sure I'd be willing to risk my career based on a path to licensure "in the works". Furthermore, to study engineering effectively at the graduate level, one needs more or less a BS level equivalent in the engineering specialty anyway.
     
  11. Feb 24, 2009 #10
    what if i only need 4 classes for each major? (we're on the trimester system)
    oh, also, my school doesnt even offer a minor in physics
     
  12. Feb 24, 2009 #11
    You don't necessarily need a B.S. in engineering to become licensed. Also, many engineering departments will let you take remedial undergraduate classes while being enrolled in a masters program.
     
  13. Feb 25, 2009 #12

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    Depends on the state.

    While it's certainly silly that some states won't license a person with a BS in physics, and an MS and PhD in engineering, that's how they operate.
     
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