Atoms in Biology - Questions Answered

In summary, atoms in biology are constantly changing in organisms. While some are recycled, others end up in deadend molecules. The food we eat becomes a part of us and our bodies go through a constant cycle or regeneration of cellular components. DNA atoms are retained for longer periods of time, but overall, we get a new body every decade.
  • #1
binbots
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I was just curious about atoms in biology. Do organisms have the same atoms all the time? Or are they always changing? When we eat do we gain new atoms etc. Sorry if this is a dumb question. I can't find anything on it maybe because it is to easy.
 
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  • #2
Both. Many are recycled over and over while others end up occasionaly in deadend molecules that the body would rather dispose of than try to handle. The food you eat dose in a real sense become part of you.
 
  • #3
That is what I thought. Thanks
 
  • #4
..they are mostly replaced..it is a constant cycle or regenesis for most cellular components...some are retained for longer periods of time (the atoms in DNA) but mostly...you get a new body every decade or so (slowly of course and not completely.)
 
  • #5


Great question! The answer is both yes and no. Let me explain.

First, let's start with the basics. Atoms are the building blocks of all matter, including living organisms. They are made up of protons, neutrons, and electrons. These subatomic particles are constantly in motion, creating a dynamic and ever-changing structure.

Now, onto your question about whether organisms have the same atoms all the time or if they are always changing. The answer is a bit of both. The atoms that make up our bodies are constantly being recycled. This means that the atoms we have in our bodies today may not be the same ones we had a year ago. This is because we are constantly taking in new atoms through the food we eat and the air we breathe, and eliminating old ones through waste and exhalation.

However, some atoms in our bodies do remain relatively constant. These are the atoms that make up our DNA, which is the genetic material that determines our physical characteristics and functions. These atoms are passed down from our parents and are essential for our survival and reproduction.

So, to answer your question about gaining new atoms when we eat, the answer is yes. We consume food that contains atoms, which are then broken down and used by our bodies to build and maintain our cells and tissues.

In summary, while some atoms in our bodies may remain relatively constant, others are constantly being exchanged and recycled. This is a fascinating aspect of biology and shows the interconnectedness of all living things. I hope this helps to answer your question!
 

Related to Atoms in Biology - Questions Answered

1. What are atoms and why are they important in biology?

Atoms are the basic building blocks of all matter, including living organisms. They are important in biology because they make up molecules and compounds that are essential for life processes such as metabolism and cell function.

2. How are atoms involved in the formation of biological molecules?

Atoms combine with other atoms through chemical bonds to form biological molecules such as proteins, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids. These molecules are essential for the structure and function of cells and organisms.

3. What is the role of electrons in atoms and how does it relate to biology?

Electrons are negatively charged particles that orbit the nucleus of an atom. In biology, electrons are involved in chemical reactions that occur within cells, such as photosynthesis and cellular respiration.

4. Can atoms in biological molecules be broken apart and reformed?

Yes, atoms in biological molecules can be broken apart and reformed through chemical reactions. This allows for the synthesis of new molecules and the breakdown of old ones, which is essential for growth, repair, and other biological processes.

5. Are all atoms in biological molecules the same?

No, not all atoms in biological molecules are the same. Different elements, such as carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen, make up the atoms in biological molecules, and their unique properties allow for the diversity and complexity of life on Earth.

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