Back Correcting the Uncertaininty Principle?

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In summary, when using a photon to measure a particle's velocity with varying wavelengths, we can only determine the particle's position within one wavelength of the measured position. This is because using a longer wavelength results in a less focused image of the particle and a larger disk diameter. Additionally, using a shorter wavelength to measure position will also impact the particle's momentum, making it difficult to accurately predict and back-correct for its position. Therefore, taking into consideration the wavelength of the photon does not significantly improve the accuracy of the particle's position.
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I'm sort of new to quantum mechanics and was wondering that when we use a photon (light) to measure a particle for its velocity (momentum) with varying wavelenghts depending on the accuracy we want, why can't we back correct to take into consideration the wavelength of the photon when finding out the probability of the position? Hence making it's position more accurate or even exact?
 
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bstacey said:
I'm sort of new to quantum mechanics and was wondering that when we use a photon (light) to measure a particle for its velocity (momentum) with varying wavelenghts depending on the accuracy we want, why can't we back correct to take into consideration the wavelength of the photon when finding out the probability of the position? Hence making it's position more accurate or even exact?
Because you can't. Using a longer wavelenght means having a not very focused image of a point: you see a disk instead of a point and the disk diameter increases with wavelenght.
 
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Well what if a shorter wavelegh was used to measure the position? Would this effect the momentum? And can't this be taken into account when predicting it and then back corecting?
 
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What do you mean by "taking into consideration the wavelength". All you can do with wave length is say "the particle is within one wavelength of the measured position". The smaller the wavelength, the more accurate the measure of position, but knowing the wavelength doesn't allow us to say more than that.

And every time you "hit" a particle with a photon to measure its position, you change its momentum and so its speed. The lower the wavelength, in order to get a more accurate position, the greater the energy of the photon so the greater change in momentum.
 

1. What is the uncertainty principle?

The uncertainty principle, also known as Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, is a fundamental principle in quantum mechanics that states that it is impossible to know the exact position and momentum of a particle at the same time. In other words, the more precisely we know the position of a particle, the less precisely we can know its momentum, and vice versa.

2. Why is the uncertainty principle important?

The uncertainty principle is important because it sets a limit on the precision with which we can measure certain physical quantities. It also has implications for our understanding of the behavior of particles at the quantum level and has been crucial in the development of quantum mechanics.

3. What is back correcting the uncertainty principle?

Back correcting the uncertainty principle is a proposed method for reducing the uncertainty in the measurement of a particle's position and momentum. This involves measuring the position and momentum of the particle multiple times and then using the average of these measurements to get a more accurate result.

4. How does back correcting the uncertainty principle work?

Back correcting the uncertainty principle works by taking multiple measurements of a particle's position and momentum and then using statistical methods to calculate the most accurate values. By repeating the measurements and taking the average, the uncertainty can be reduced.

5. What are the potential applications of back correcting the uncertainty principle?

If successfully implemented, back correcting the uncertainty principle could have applications in various fields such as quantum computing, precision measurements, and even in improving the accuracy of medical imaging techniques. It could also help in further understanding the behavior of particles at the quantum level.

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