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Big Bang From A Collision Of Protons?

  1. Mar 16, 2009 #1
    I'm watching a documentary on the L.H.C and it struck me as odd when the narrator mentioned that the L.H.C. would be able to create the types of temperatures and pressures that were present at the big bang beginning.

    I found it odd that two protons could recreate those conditions.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 16, 2009 #2

    Vanadium 50

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    Obviously, it doesn't recreate all the conditions of the big bang. For example, as you point out, the number of protons is much smaller. But it does recreate some of them - the energy per collision, for example.
     
  4. Mar 16, 2009 #3
    The point of the L.H.C is to find out what happened when the Big Back occurred.

    As you might know, before the Big Bang the universe was infinitely dense and extremely warm, and when the universe "exploded", the universe quickly began to expand and cool.

    The phenomenon of how and why the Big Bang occurred is very interesting, which is why we attempt to recreate it, but these come with some worst-case-scenario theories. Some of them are theories such as miniature Black Holes, instant mega storms, sudden desctruction of the planet etc. etc.
     
  5. Mar 16, 2009 #4

    Vanadium 50

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    These are not theories. I suggest "fantasies" is closer to the truth.
     
  6. Mar 17, 2009 #5

    Chalnoth

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    Well, it recreates collisions earlier than we've ever recreated collisions before. But certainly it doesn't recreate collisions that happened right at the hottest point, which was during reheating as inflation ended.
     
  7. Mar 19, 2009 #6
    O, your presentation will drive some partical physics guys crazy.Collider is just a collider, it is the toy that some guys who likes smashing things can make fun of. If you talk to some guy like Veltman (the dynamite prize laureate) about simulateing early universe in LHC, he will kick your *** maybe.Yes,I heard he talking about his willing to kick the *** of cosmo guys.
     
  8. Mar 19, 2009 #7
    When they say "create the types of temperatures and pressures that were present at the big bang beginning"

    What they really mean is:

    - The big bang era was very high energy
    - The LHC collisions are very high energy

    This is the only "condition" replicated and really an LHC collision is not like the big bang at all. I really wish the press would not use the "big bang machine" analogy.
     
  9. Mar 19, 2009 #8

    Chalnoth

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    Well, it gets a little bit closer when they slam heavy metal nuclei together, as in that case they generate a quark-gluon plasma, which is the matter state that existed when the early universe was at very high temperatures. Of course, many current accelerators do this already, LHC will just go to higher energies.
     
  10. Mar 19, 2009 #9
    Oh, that is interesting, thanks for the correction. But this will I take it not be happening in proton-proton collisions?
     
  11. Mar 19, 2009 #10

    Chalnoth

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    I don't believe so, no.
     
  12. Mar 20, 2009 #11
    Is it? It seems to me that this statement is taken from the general press, which tries to explain to people why they are building this machine. But I've never read or herd any scientist actually say that.

    The statement doesnt even make sense.

    Afaik, the LHC is built simply to push the limit of attainable energi in the hope that some 'new' (more massive) particles emerge. Primarirly the last particle missing in the standard model. The higgs. But also the hope is that it might be able to produce the superpartners and 'prove' supersymetri.

    Most of what is written in the normal press about LHC is tabloid sensation style. Mostly because the journalists have no clue whatsoever what its all about, and need to explain why humans would use so much money on a machine no one understands.

    So, i think humans will continue to build more powerfull accelerators every 50 years or so, but they will never be about trying to 'recreate the big bang'...

    /Frederic
     
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